Eliza Acton

MODERN COOKERY,

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES.

MODERN COOKERY,

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES:

REDUCED TO

A SYSTEM OF EASY PRACTICE,

FOR THE USE OF PRIVATE FAMILIES.

IN A SERIES OF PRACTICAL RECEIPTS, WHICH HAVE BEEN STRICTLY TESTED, AND ARE GIVEN WITH THE MOST MINUTE EXACTNESS.

 

BY ELIZA ACTON.

 

ILLUSTRATED WITH NUMEROUS WOODCUTS.

 

LONDON:
LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN AND LONGMANS,
PATERNOSTER ROW.

1845.

iv

London:
Printed by Stewart and Murray,
Old Bailey.

v

DEDICATED

TO THE

YOUNG HOUSEKEEPERS

OF ENGLAND.

vii

PREFACE.

The proper and wholesome preparation of our daily food, though it may hold in the estimation of the world but a very humble place among the useful arts of life, can scarcely be considered an altogether unimportant one, involving so entirely, as it does, both health and comfort.

England is, beyond most other countries, rich in the varied and abundant produce of its soil, or of its commerce, which in turn supply to it all that the necessities or the luxury of its people can demand; yet, until within very recent years, its cookery has remained far inferior to that of nations much less advanced in civilization; and foreigners have been called in to furnish to the tables of our aristocracy, and of the wealthier orders of the community, those refinements of the art which were not to be obtained from native talent.

Our improvement was for a long time opposed by our own strong and stubborn prejudices against innovation in general, and against the innovations of strangers in particular; but these, of late, have fast given way before the more rational and liberal spirit of the times: viii happily for ourselves, we have ceased to be too bigoted, or too proud to profit by the superior information and experience of others upon any subject of utility. The present age is one of rapid and universally progressing knowledge, and nothing which is really calculated to advance either the great or the small interests of society is now regarded as too homely or too insignificant for notice. The details of domestic economy, in particular, are no longer sneered at as beneath the regard of the educated and accomplished; and the truly refined, intelligent, and high-minded women of England have ceased, in these days of comparative good sense, to consider their attention to such details as inconsistent with their dignity, or injurious to their attractions:—and who can direct their households with the same taste, the same judgment, and the same watchful care for the comfort of others as themselves? Who, indeed, can guard all the interests of home as they can? And surely a woman does not preside less pleasingly in her own immediate circle, nor do the honours of her table, or of her drawing-room, with less grace and propriety for having given (often from pursuits much more congenial to her) some portion of the day to the examination and control of her domestic affairs; it is rare, too, we should suppose, for a husband to be otherwise than grateful to his wife for the exertion of a surveillance which, if steadily and judiciously maintained, will affect his expenditure beyond all that a careless calculator would ix imagine possible. This, at a period when the struggle for income is so general, and the means of half the families holding a certain rank in the world are so insufficient for the support of their position, is a consideration of very deep importance.

Few things are more certain to involve persons of narrow fortune in painful difficulties than the ruinous, because constant (though not always perceptible), extravagance which so often exists in every department of a house of which the sole regulation is left to servants, who, more than any other class of people in the world, would appear to be ignorant of the true value of money, and of the means of economizing it. We speak, of course, of the generality. Some amongst them there are, we know, equally trustworthy and conscientious, who protect their employers’ property from abuse more scrupulously even than if it were their own; but the greater number are reckless enough in their wasteful profusion when uncontrolled by the eye of a superior: an inexperienced housekeeper cannot be too soon aware of this. It sometimes happens, however, that the young mistress of a family has had no opportunity before her marriage of acquiring the knowledge which would enable her to conduct her household concerns as she could desire; and that, with a high sense of her duties, and an earnest wish to fulfil them to the utmost, she is prevented by her entire ignorance of domestic affairs from accomplishing her object. x In such a case, unless she should chance to possess that rare treasure of common English life, a superior cook,* the economy of her table will not be amongst the lightest of her difficulties; and she may be placed, perhaps, by circumstances, at a distance from every friend who could counsel or assist her. Thrown thus entirely upon her own resources, she will naturally and gladly avail herself of the aid to be derived from such books as can really afford to her the information she requires. Many admirably calculated to do this, in part, are already in possession of the public; but amongst the large number of works on cookery, which we have carefully perused, we have never yet met with one which appeared to us either quite intended for, or entirely suited to the need of the totally inexperienced; none, in fact, which contained the first rudiments of the art, with directions so practical, clear, and simple, as to be at once understood, and easily followed, by those who had no previous knowledge of the subject. This deficiency, we have endeavoured in the xi present volume to supply, by such thoroughly explicit and minute instructions as may, we trust, be readily comprehended and carried out by any class of learners; our receipts, moreover, with a few trifling exceptions which are scrupulously specified, are confined to such as may be perfectly depended on, from having been proved beneath our own roof and under our own personal inspection. We have trusted nothing to others; but having desired sincerely to render the work one of genuine usefulness, we have spared neither cost nor labour to make it so, as the very plan on which it has been written must of itself, we think, evidently prove. It contains some novel features, calculated, we hope, not only to facilitate the labours of the kitchen, but to be of service likewise to those by whom they are directed. The principal of these is the summary appended to the receipts, of the different ingredients which they contain, with the exact proportion of each, and the precise time required to dress the whole. This shows at a glance what articles have to be prepared beforehand, and the hour at which they must be ready; while it affords great facility as well, for an estimate of the expense attending them. The additional space occupied by this closeness of detail, has necessarily prevented the admission of so great a variety of receipts as the book might otherwise have comprised; but a limited number, thus completely explained, may perhaps be more acceptable to the reader than a larger mass of materials vaguely given.

xii

Our directions for boning poultry, game, &c., are also, we may venture to say, entirely new, no author that is known to us having hitherto afforded the slightest information on the subject; but while we have done our utmost to simplify and to render intelligible this, and several other processes not generally well understood by ordinary cooks, our first and best attention has been bestowed on those articles of food of which the consumption is the most general, and which are therefore of the greatest consequence; and on what are usually termed, plain English dishes. With these we have intermingled many foreign ones which we know to be excellent of their kind, and which now so far belong to our national cookery, as to be met with commonly at all refined modern tables. But we find that we have, in every way, so far exceeded the limits assigned to us for our volume, that we feel compelled to take here, our somewhat abrupt leave of the reader; who will, no doubt, discover easily, without our assistance, both any merit and any deficiency which may exist in the work.

* It can scarcely be expected that good cooks should abound amongst us, if we consider how very few receive any training to fit them for their business. Every craft has its apprentices; but servants are generally left to scramble together as they can, from any source which accident may open to them, a knowledge of their respective duties. We have often thought, that schools in which these duties should be taught them thoroughly, would be of far greater benefit to them than is the half-knowledge of comparatively un-useful matters so frequently bestowed on them by charitable educationists.

xiii

CONTENTS.

Throughout the Table of Contents, repeated page numbers were printed as “ib.” I have replaced this notation with the actual number.

CHAPTER I.
SOUPS.
Page
Introductory Remarks 1
A few Directions to the Cook 2
To thicken Soups 4
To fry Bread to serve with Soups 5
Sippets à la Reine 6
To make Nouilles, an excellent substitute for Vermicelli 6
Vegetable Vermicelli for Soups 6
Bouillon, or good Beef Broth. (French Receipt.) 7
Clear, Pale, Gravy Soup, or Stock 10
Another receipt for Gravy Soup 11
Vermicelli Soup. (Potage au Vermicelle.) 12
Semoulina Soup. (Soupe à la Semoule.) 12
Macaroni Soup 13
Potage aux Nouilles (or Taillerine Soup) 13
Sago Soup 14
Tapioca Soup 14
Rice Soup 14
White Rice Soup 15
Rice Flour Soup 15
Stock for White Soups 16
Mutton-Stock for Soups 16
The Lord Mayor’s Soup 17
The Lord Mayor’s Soup. (Author’s receipt.) 18
Cocoa-nut Soup 20
Chestnut Soup 20
Jerusalem Artichoke (or Palestine Soup) 21
Common Carrot Soup 22
A finer Carrot Soup 22
Common Turnip Soup 23
A quickly made Turnip Soup 24
Potato Soup 24
Apple Soup 24
Parsnep Soup 25
Another Parsnep Soup 25
Westerfield White Soup 25
A richer White Soup 27
Mock Turtle Soup 28
Old-fashioned Mock Turtle 31
Good Calf’s-head Soup (not expensive) 34
Potage à la Reine 35
White Oyster Soup (or, Oyster Soup à la Reine) 36
Rabbit Soup, à la Reine 37
Brown Rabbit Soup 38
Superlative Hare Soup 39
A less expensive Hare Soup 39
Pheasant Soup 40
Another Pheasant Soup 41
Partridge Soup 42
Mullagatawny Soup 42
To boil Rice for Mullagatawny Soup, or Curries 44
Another receipt for boiling Rice 45
Vegetable Mullagatawny 46
Cucumber Soup 47
An excellent Green Peas Soup 48
Green Peas Soup without meat 49
xiv A cheap Green Peas Soup 50
Rich Peas Soup 51
Common Peas Soup 52
Peas Soup without meat 52
Oxtail Soup 53
A cheap and good Stew-Soup 54
Soup in-haste 54
Veal or Mutton Broth 55
Rice Soup with Vermicelli 56
CHAPTER II.
FISH.
To choose Fish 56
To clean Fish 59
To sweeten tainted Fish 60
Brine for boiling Fish 60
To render boiled Fish firm 61
To keep Fish hot for table 61
To boil a Turbot 61
Turbot à la Crême 63
Turbot au Béchamel 63
To boil a Brill 63
To boil Salmon 63
Crimped Salmon 64
Salmon à la St. Marcel 65
To boil Cod Fish 65
Slices of Cod Fish fried 66
Stewed Cod Fish 66
Stewed Cod Fish in brown sauce 67
To boil Salt Fish 67
Salt Fish à la Maître D’ Hotel 68
To boil Cod’s Sounds 68
To fry Cod’s Sounds in batter 69
To fry Soles 69
To boil Soles 70
Fillets of Soles 71
Baked Soles (or Soles au Plat) 72
Soles stewed in cream 72
To fry Whitings 73
Fillets of Whitings 74
To boil Whitings. (French receipt.) 74
Baked Whitings à la Française 74
To boil Mackerel 75
To bake Mackerel 76
Fried Mackerel (common French receipt) 76
Fillets of Mackerel 77
Mackerel broiled whole 77
Mackerel stewed in wine 78
Fillets of Mackerel stewed in wine (excellent) 78
To boil Haddocks 79
Baked Haddocks 79
To fry Haddocks 80
Fresh Herrings (Farleigh receipt) 80
To boil Plaice or Flounders 80
To fry Plaice or Flounders 81
To roast, bake, or broil Red Mullet 81
To boil Grey Mullet 81
To fry Smelts 82
Baked Smelts 82
To dress White Bait (Greenwich receipt) 83
Shad, Touraine fashion 83
Stewed Trout (good common receipt) 84
To boil Pike 84
To bake Pike 85
To bake Pike (superior receipt) 86
To boil Perch 86
To fry Perch or Tench 87
To fry Eels 87
Boiled Eels (German receipt) 87
Eels (Cornish receipt) 88
To boil Lobsters 89
Hot Crab 89
To boil Cray-fish 90
To boil Prawns 90
To boil Shrimps 90
Croute-aux-Crevettes, or Shrimp-Toast 91
xv Shrimp-Toast à la Reine 91
Oysters 92
To stew Oysters 92
To scallop Oysters 93
Scallopped Oysters à la Reine 94
Oyster Sausages 94
To fry Oysters 95
Red Herrings à la Dauphin 95
Red Herrings (common English mode) 95
Anchovies fried in batter 96
CHAPTER III.
GRAVIES.
Introductory Remarks 96
To heighten the Colour and Flavour of Gravies 98
Shin of Beef Stock for Gravies 99
Rich pale Veal Gravy, or Consommée 100
Rich deep-coloured Veal Gravy 101
Good Beef or Veal Gravy (English receipt) 102
A rich English brown Gravy 103
Gravy for Venison 103
Another Gravy for Venison 104
A rich Gravy for Venison 104
Sweet Sauce or Gravy for Venison 105
Espagnole (Spanish Sauce), a highly-flavoured Gravy 105
Espagnole with Wine 105
Jus des Rognons (or Kidney Gravy) 106
Gravy-in-haste 107
Cheap Gravy for a Roast Fowl 107
Another cheap Gravy for a Fowl 108
Quite common Brown Gravy 108
Gravy or Sauce for a Goose 109
Orange Gravy for Wild Fowl 109
Meat Jellies for Pies or Sauces 109
A cheaper Meat Jelly 111
Glaze 111
Aspic, or clear Savoury Jelly 112
CHAPTER IV.
SAUCES.
Remarks on Sauces 113
To thicken Sauces 114
French Thickening, or Brown Roux 114
White Roux, or French Thickening 115
Sauce Tournée 115
Béchamel 116
A less expensive Béchamel 117
Another common Béchamel 117
Rich melted Butter 117
Melted Butter (a good common receipt) 118
French melted Butter 118
Norfolk Sauce (or rich melted Butter without Flour) 118
White melted Butter 119
Burnt Butter 119
Clarified Butter 119
Very good Egg Sauce 120
Common Egg Sauce 120
Egg Sauce for Calf’s Head 120
English White Sauce 121
Very common White Sauce 121
Dutch Sauce 121
Fricassee Sauce 122
xvi Bread Sauce 122
Bread Sauce with Onion 123
Common Lobster Sauce 124
Good Lobster Sauce 124
Good Oyster Sauce 125
Common Oyster Sauce 125
Shrimp Sauce 126
Anchovy Sauce 126
Cream Sauce for Fish 126
Sharp Maître D’ Hotel Sauce (English receipt) 127
French Maître D’ Hotel, or Steward’s Sauce) 127
Maître D’ Hotel Sauce, Maigre (or without Gravy) 128
Cold Maître D’ Hotel (or Steward’s Sauce) 129
The Lady’s Sauce for Fish 129
Sauce Robert 130
Sauce Piquante 130
Excellent Horse-radish Sauce (to serve hot or cold with Roast Beef) 130
Hot Horse-radish Sauce 131
Christopher North’s Own Sauce for many Meats 131
Poor Man’s Sauce (served with Turkey Poults) 132
Salad Dressing 133
French Salad Dressing 134
Our own Sauce for Salad or cold Meat 134
Mayonnaise (a very fine Sauce for cold Meat, Poultry, Fish, or Salad) 134
Remoulade 135
Fennel Sauce 136
Parsley and Butter 136
Gooseberry Sauce for Mackerel 137
Common Sorrel Sauce 137
Asparagus Sauce for Lamb Cutlets 138
Mint Sauce for Roast Lamb 138
Caper Sauce 139
Brown Caper Sauce 139
Caper Sauce for Fish 139
Common Cucumber Sauce 139
Another common Sauce of Cucumbers 140
White Cucumber Sauce 140
White Mushroom Sauce 141
Another Mushroom Sauce 141
Brown Mushroom Sauce 141
Common Tomata Sauce 141
A finer Tomata Sauce 142
Apple Sauce 143
Brown Apple Sauce 143
White Onion Sauce 144
Brown Onion Sauce 144
Another brown Onion Sauce 144
Soubise 144
Soubise (French Receipt) 145
Mild Ragout of Garlic, or L’Ail à la Bordelaise 145
Mild Eschalot Sauce 146
A fine Sauce, or Purée of Vegetable Marrow 146
Excellent Turnip, or, Artichoke Sauce, for boiled Meat 147
Olive Sauce 148
Celery Sauce 148
White Chestnut Sauce 149
Brown Chestnut Sauce 149
Sweet Pudding Sauce 150
Punch Sauce for Sweet Puddings 150
Common Pudding Sauce 151
A delicious German Pudding Sauce 151
Parsley-green, for colouring Sauces 151
To Crisp Parsley 152
Fried Parsley 152
Anchovy Butter (excellent) 152
Tartar Mustard 153
Another Tartar Mustard 153
Mild Mustard 154
Mustard, the common way 154
French Batter for frying Vegetables, and for Apple, Peach, or Orange Fritters 154
To prepare Bread for Frying Fish 155
Browned Flour for thickening Soups and Gravies 155
Fried Bread-Crumbs 155
xvii CHAPTER V.
STORE SAUCES.
Observations 156
Chetney Sauce 157
Mushroom Catsup 158
Mushroom Catsup (another receipt) 160
Double Mushroom Catsup 160
Compound, or, Cook’s Catsup 160
Walnut Catsup 161
Lemon Pickle, or Catsup 162
Pontac Catsup for Fish 162
Bottled Tomatas, or, Tomata Catsup 162
Epicurean Sauce 163
Tarragon Vinegar 163
Green Mint Vinegar 164
Cucumber Vinegar 164
Celery Vinegar 164
Eschalot, or Garlic Vinegar 165
Eschalot Wine 165
Horse-radish Vinegar 165
Cayenne Vinegar 166
Lemon Brandy for flavouring Sweet Dishes 166
Another Store Flavouring for Puddings or Cakes 166
Dried Mushrooms 167
Mushroom Powder 167
Potato Flour (Fecule de Pommes de Terre) 168
To make Flour of Rice 168
Powder of Savoury Herbs 168
The Doctor’s Zest 169
CHAPTER VI.
FORCEMEATS.
General Remarks 169
Good Common Forcemeat for Veal, Turkeys, &c., No. 1 170
Another Good Common Forcemeat, No. 2 171
Superior Suet Forcemeat, No. 3 172
Common Suet Forcemeat, No. 4 172
Oyster Forcemeat, No. 5 173
Finer Oyster Forcemeat, No. 6 173
Mushroom Forcemeat, No. 7 174
Forcemeat for Hare, No. 8 175
Onion and Sage stuffing for Geese, Ducks, &c., No. 9 175
Cook’s Forcemeat for Geese or Ducks, No. 10 175
Forcemeat Balls, for Mock Turtle Soups, No. 11 176
Egg Balls, No. 12 177
Brain Cakes, No. 13 177
Another Receipt for Brain Cakes, No. 14 178
Chestnut Forcemeat, No. 15 178
An excellent French Forcemeat, No. 16 179
French Forcemeat, called Quenelles, No. 17 180
Forcemeat for Raised and other Cold Pies, No. 18 181
Panada, No. 19 181
xviii CHAPTER VII.
BOILING, ROASTING, ETC.
To Boil Meat 183
Poêlée 185
A Blanc 185
Roasting 186
Steaming 189
Stewing 190
Broiling 192
Frying 195
Baking 196
Braising 198
Larding 200
Boning 201
To Blanch Meat or Vegetables 201
Glazing 202
Toasting 202
Browning with Salamander 203
CHAPTER VIII.
BEEF.
To Choose Beef 204
To Roast Sirloin, or Ribs of Beef 204
Roast Rump of Beef 206
To Roast part of a Round of Beef 206
To Roast a Fillet of Beef 206
Roast Beef Steaks 207
To broil Beef Steaks 207
Beef Steaks à la Française 209
Beef Steaks à la Française, (another receipt) 209
Stewed Reef Steak 210
Fried Beef Steaks 210
Beef Steak Stewed in its Own Gravy (good and wholesome) 210
Beef or Mutton Cake (very good) 211
German Stew 212
Welsh Stew 212
A good English Stew 213
To stew Shin of Beef 214
French Beef à la Mode (common receipt) 215
Stewed Sirloin of Beef 215
To stew a Rump of Beef 216
Beef Palates 217
Beef Palates (Neapolitan mode) 218
Stewed Ox-tails 218
Broiled Ox-tail (good) 219
To Salt and Pickle Beef in various ways 219
To salt and boil a Round of Beef 220
Hamburgh Pickle for Beef Hams, and Tongues 220
Another Pickle for Tongues, Beef and Hams 221
Dutch, or Hung Beef 221
Collared Beef 222
Collared Beef (another receipt) 223
A common receipt for Salting Beef 223
Spiced Round of Beef (very highly flavoured) 223
Spiced Beef (good and wholesome) 224
A Miniature Round of Beef 225
Stufato (a Neapolitan receipt) 226
Beef Roll (or Canellon de Bœuf) 227
Minced Collops au Naturel 228
Savoury Minced Collops 228
A richer variety of Minced Collops 229
Scotch Minced Collops 229
Beef Tongues 229
xix Beef Tongues (a Suffolk receipt) 230
To Dress Beef Tongues 230
Bordyke receipt for Stewing a Tongue 231
To roast a Beef Heart 232
Beef Kidney 232
Beef Kidney (a plainer way) 232
An excellent Hash of Cold Beef or Mutton 233
A common Hash of cold Beef or Mutton 233
Breslaw of Beef (good) 234
Norman Hash 234
French receipt for Hashed Bouilli 235
Baked Minced Beef 235
Saunders 236
To boil Marrow-bones 236
Baked Marrow-bones 236
Clarified Marrow for keeping 237
CHAPTER IX.
VEAL.
To choose Veal 237
To take the Hair from a Calf’s Head with the skin on 238
Boiled Calf’s Head 239
Calf’s Head, the Warder’s way (an excellent receipt) 240
Prepared Calf’s Head (the Cook’s receipt) 240
Burlington Whimsey 241
Cutlets of Calf’s Head 242
Hashed Calf’s Head 243
Cheap Hash of Calf’s Head 243
To dress cold Calf’s Head, or Veal, à la Maître d’ Hotel (English receipt) 244
Calf’s Head Brawn (Author’s receipt) 245
To roast a Fillet of Veal 247
Boiled Fillet of Veal 247
Roast Loin of Veal 247
Boiled Loin of Veal 248
Stewed Loin of Veal 248
Boiled Breast of Veal 249
To roast a Breast of Veal 249
To bone a Shoulder of Veal, Mutton, or Lamb 250
Stewed Shoulder of Veal (English receipt) 250
Roast Neck of Veal 251
Neck of Veal à la Crême; or au Béchamel 251
Knuckle of Veal en Ragout 252
Boiled Knuckle of Veal 252
Small Pain de Veau, or Veal Cake 253
Bordyke Veal Cake (good) 253
Fricandeau of Veal 254
Spring Stew of Veal 255
Brézolles 256
Norman Harrico 257
Veal Cutlets 257
Veal Cutlets à l’Indienne (or Indian Fashion) 258
Veal Cutlets à la Française 259
Veal Cutlets à la Mode de Londres (or London Fashion) 259
Sweetbreads (simply dressed) 260
Sweetbread Cutlets 261
Stewed Calf’s Feet (cheap and good) 261
Calf’s Liver Fried 262
To roast Calf’s Liver 263
Minced Veal 263
Minced Veal with Oysters 264
Veal Sydney 265
xx CHAPTER X.
MUTTON AND LAMB.
To choose Mutton 266
To roast a Haunch of Mutton 267
Roast Saddle of Mutton 268
To roast a Leg of Mutton 268
Superior Receipt for roast Leg of Mutton 269
Braised Leg of Mutton 270
Leg of Mutton honed and forced 270
Mock Venison 271
To boil a Leg of Mutton (an excellent receipt) 272
Cold roast Leg of Mutton redressed 273
Fillet of Mutton 273
To roast a Loin of Mutton 274
To dress a Loin of Mutton like Venison 274
To roast a Shoulder of Mutton 275
Spiced Shoulder of Mutton 275
Forced Shoulder of Mutton 276
Mutton Cutlets stewed in their own Gravy (good) 276
To broil Mutton Cutlets 277
China Chilo 277
A good Family Stew of Mutton 278
An Irish Stew 279
Cutlets of cold Mutton 279
Mutton Kidneys à la Française 280
To roast a Quarter of Lamb 281
Roast Saddle of Lamb 281
Roast Loin of Lamb 282
Stewed Leg of Lamb, with white Sauce 282
Loin of Lamb stewed in Butter 282
Lamb or Mutton Cutlets, with Soubise Sauce 283
Lamb Cutlets in their own Gravy 283
CHAPTER XI.
PORK.
To choose Pork 284
To melt Lard 285
To preserve unmelted Lard for many months 286
To roast a Sucking Pig 286
Baked Pig 288
Pig à la Tartare 288
Sucking Pig, en blanquette 288
To roast Pork 289
To roast a Saddle of Pork 289
To broil or fry Pork Cutlets 290
Cobbett’s Receipt for curing Bacon 290
A genuine Yorkshire Receipt for curing Hams and Bacon 292
Kentish mode of cutting up and curing a Pig 293
French Bacon for larding 294
To pickle Cheeks of Bacon and Hams 294
Hams superior to Westphalia 294
Hams (Bordyke receipt) 296
To boil a Ham 296
French Receipt for boiling a Ham 298
To bake a Ham 298
To boil Bacon 298
Bacon broiled or fried 299
Dressed Rashers of Bacon 299
Tonbridge Brawn 300
Italian Pork Cheese 301
xxi Sausage-meat Cake (or Pain de Porc Frais) 301
Sausages 301
Kentish Sausage-meat 302
Excellent Sausages 303
Pounded Sausage-meat (very good) 303
Boiled Sausages 303
Sausages and Chestnuts (an excellent dish) 303
CHAPTER XII.
POULTRY.
To choose Poultry 304
To bone a Fowl or Turkey without opening it 305
Another mode of boning a Fowl or Turkey 306
To bone Fowls for Fricassees, Curries, and Pies 308
To roast a Turkey 308
To boil a Turkey 309
Turkey boned and forced (an excellent receipt) 310
Turkey à la Flamande, or dinde poudrée 312
To roast a Goose 313
To roast a green Goose 314
To roast a Fowl 314
Roast Fowl (a French receipt) 315
To roast a Guinea Fowl 316
Fowl à la Carlsfors 316
Boiled Fowls 317
To broil a Chicken or Fowl 317
Fricasseed Fowls or Chickens 318
Chicken Cutlets 319
Cutlets of Fowls, Partridges, or Pigeons (French receipt) 319
Fried Chicken à la Malabar 320
Hashed Fowl 320
Minced Fowl (French receipt) 321
Grillade of cold Fowls 322
Cold fowls, en friture 322
Cold Fowls (the Housekeeper’s receipt. A supper dish) 322
Fowls à la Mayonnaise 323
To roast Ducks 323
To roast Pigeons 324
To boil Pigeons 325
CHAPTER XIII.
GAME.
To choose Game 325
To roast a Haunch of Venison 327
To stew a Shoulder of Venison 328
To hash Venison 329
To roast a Hare 329
Roast Hare (superior receipt) 331
Stewed Hare 331
To roast a Rabbit 332
To boil Rabbits 333
Fried Rabbit 333
To roast a Pheasant 334
Boudin of Pheasant, à la Richelieu 334
To roast Partridges 335
Boiled Partridges 336
Partridges with Mushrooms 337
Broiled Partridge (English receipt) 337
Broiled Partridge (French receipt) 338
xxii The French, or Red-legged Partridge 338
To roast Black Cock and Grey Hen 338
To roast Grouse 339
A Salmi of Moorfowl, Pheasants, or Partridges 340
A French Salmi, or Hash of Game 341
To roast Woodcocks or Snipes 341
To roast the Pintail or Sea-Pheasant 342
To roast Wild-Ducks 342
CHAPTER XIV.
CURRIES, POTTED MEATS, &c.
Remarks on Curries 343
Mr. Arnott’s Currie Powder 344
Mr. Arnott’s Currie 345
A Bengal Currie 346
A dry Currie 346
A common Indian Currie 347
Selim’s Curries, (Captain White’s) 349
Curried Macaroni 349
Curried Eggs 350
Curried Sweetbreads 351
Curried Oysters 351
Curried Gravy 352
Potted Meats 353
Potted Ham 354
Potted Chicken, Partridge, or Pheasant 356
Potted Ox Tongue 356
Potted Anchovies 356
Lobster Butter 357
Potted Shrimps 357
Potted Mushrooms, (see Chapter XV.) 358
CHAPTER XV.
VEGETABLES.
Observations on Vegetables 358
To clear Vegetables from Insects 359
To boil Vegetables green 359
To boil Potatoes (genuine Irish receipt) 359
To boil Potatoes (Lancashire receipt) 360
To boil new Potatoes 361
New Potatoes in Butter 361
To boil Potatoes (Captain Kater’s receipt) 362
To roast or bake Potatoes 362
Scooped Potatoes 362
Fried Potatoes 363
Mashed Potatoes 363
English Potatoe Balls 364
Potatoe Boulettes (good) 365
Potatoe Rissoles (French) 365
Potatoes à la Maître d’ Hotel 365
Potatoes à la Crême 366
To boil Sea-Kale 366
Sea-Kale stewed in Gravy 366
Spinage (French receipt) 366
Spinage á l’Anglaise, or English fashion 367
Spinage (common English mode) 368
Another common English receipt for Spinage 368
Boiled Turnip Radishes 368
Boiled Leeks 369
To boil Asparagus 369
xxiii Asparagus-points dressed like Peas 369
To boil Green Peas 370
Green Peas à la Française, or French fashion 371
Green Peas with cream 372
To boil French Beans 372
French Beans à la Française 373
An excellent receipt for French Beans à la Française 373
To boil Windsor Beans 373
Dressed Cucumbers 374
Mandrang, or Mandram (West Indian receipt) 375
Another receipt for Mandram 375
Dressed Cucumber (Author’s receipt) 375
Stewed Cucumber (English mode) 375
Cucumbers à la Poulette 376
Cucumbers à la Crême 377
Fried Cucumbers, to serve in common stews, hashes, and minces 377
Melon 377
Salad 377
French Salad 378
Suffolk Salad 378
Yorkshire Ploughman’s Salad 379
Des Cerneaux, or Walnut Salad 379
To boil Cauliflowers 379
Cauliflowers, French receipt 379
Cauliflowers with Parmesan Cheese 380
Cauliflowers à la Française 380
Broccoli 380
To boil Artichokes 381
Artichokes en Salade 381
Vegetable Marrow 381
Tomatas en Salade 382
Roast Tomatas 382
Stewed Tomatas 383
Forced Tomatas (English receipt) 383
Forced Tomatas (French receipt) 383
Purée of Tomatas 384
Mushrooms au Beurre 384
Potted Mushrooms 386
Mushroom-Toast, or Croute aux Champignons 386
Truffles 387
Truffles with Champagne (à la Serviette) 387
Truffles à l’Italienne 388
To boil Sprouts, Cabbages, or Savoys 388
Stewed Cabbage 389
To boil Turnips 389
To mash Turnips 389
Turnips in white Sauce 390
Turnips stewed in Butter 390
Turnips in Gravy 391
To boil Carrots 391
Carrots, the Windsor receipt 392
Sweet Carrots (second course dish) 392
Carrots au Beurre 393
To boil Parsneps 393
Fried Parsneps 394
Jerusalem Artichokes 394
To fry Jerusalem Artichokes 394
Jerusalem Artichokes à la Reine 394
Mashed Jerusalem Artichokes 395
Haricots Blancs 395
To boil Beet-Root 396
Stewed Beet-Root 396
To stew Red Cabbage (Flemish receipt) 397
Brussels Sprouts 397
Salsify 398
Fried Salsify 398
Boiled Celery 398
Stewed Celery 399
Stewed Onions 399
Stewed Chestnuts 400
xxiv CHAPTER XVI.
PASTRY.
Introductory Remarks 401
To Glaze or Ice Pastry 402
Feuilletage, or fine Puff Paste 402
Very good Light Paste 404
English Puff Paste 404
Cream Crust (very good) 405
Pâte Brisée, (or French Crust for hot or cold Meat Pies) 405
Flead Crust 406
Common Suet-Crust for Pies 406
Very superior Suet-Crust 407
Very rich Short Crust for Tarts 407
Brioche Paste 407
Modern Potato-Pasty, (an excellent Family Dish) 409
Casserole of Rice 411
A good common English Game Pie 411
Modern Chicken Pie 412
A common Chicken Pie 413
Pigeon Pie 413
Beef-steak Pie 414
Mutton Pie. (common) 415
A good Mutton Pie 415
Raised Pies 416
A Vol-au-vent 418
A Vol-au-vent of Fruit 419
English Oyster Patties 420
Excellent Meat Rolls 420
Patties, Tartlets, or small Vols-au-vents 421
Another receipt for Tartlets 421
A Sefton or Veal Custard 422
Am Apple Cake 422
Tourte Meringuée, (or Tart with Royal Icing) 423
Barberry Tart 424
Genoises à la Reine, (or Her Majesty’s Pastry) 424
Almond Paste 425
Tartlets of Almond Paste 426
Mincemeat (Author’s receipt) 427
Superlative Mincemeat 427
Mince Pies 428
Mince Pies Royal 428
Pudding-Pies 429
Pudding-Pies (a common receipt) 429
Cocoa-nut Cheesecakes (a Jamaica receipt) 429
Lemon Cheesecakes (Christ-Church-College receipt) 430
Very superior Lemon Cheesecakes 430
Common Lemon Tartlets 431
Madame Werner’s Rosenvik Cheesecakes 431
Norfolk Cheesecakes 432
Fanchonnettes 432
Pastry Sandwiches 433
Lemon Sandwiches 433
Strawberry Tartlets 433
Currant Jelly Tartlets or Custards 433
Raspberry Puffs 434
Store Mixture for Lemon Tartlets which will remain good for a year or two 434
CHAPTER XVII.
BOILED PUDDINGS.
General directions for Boiled Puddings 435
To clean Currants for Puddings or Cakes 437
To mix Batter for Puddings 438
Suet-Crust for Meat or Fruit Puddings 438
Butter Crust for Puddings 439
xxv Beef-steak, or John Bull’s Pudding 439
Small Beef-steak Pudding 441
Ruth Pinch’s Pudding, (or Pudding à la Dickens) 441
Superlative Beef Pudding 442
Partridge Pudding 442
Common Batter Pudding 442
Another Batter Pudding 443
Black Cap Pudding 443
Batter Fruit Pudding 444
Kentish Suet Pudding 444
Another Suet Pudding 445
A cheap Suet Pudding 445
Apple, Currant, Cherry, or other fresh Fruit Pudding 445
A common Apple Pudding 446
Her Majesty’s Pudding 447
Small Custard Pudding 447
Common Custard Pudding 448
Prince Albert’s Pudding 448
German Pudding and Sauce 449
A Cabinet Pudding 449
A very fine Cabinet Pudding 450
Miss Bremer’s Pudding 451
Very good Raisin Pudding 452
A superior Raisin Pudding 452
The Elegant Economist’s Pudding 453
Pudding à la Scoones 453
Ingoldsby Christmas Puddings 454
Cottage Christmas Pudding 454
A Barford Plum Pudding 455
Small light Plum Pudding 455
Another Pudding (light and wholesome) 455
Vegetable Plum Pudding (cheap and good) 456
An excellent small Mincemeat Pudding 456
The Author’s Christmas Pudding 456
A Well Pudding 457
Rolled Pudding 458
Bread Pudding 458
Brown Bread Pudding 459
A good boiled Rice Pudding 459
Cheap Rice Pudding 460
Rice and Gooseberry Pudding 460
Tomata Pudding or Dumplings (American receipt) 460
Fashionable Apple Dumplings 461
Orange Snow Balls 462
Apple Snow Balls 462
Light Currant Dumplings 462
Lemon Dumplings 462
Suffolk, or Hard Dumplings 463
Norfolk Dumplings 463
Boiled Rice to serve with Stewed Fruit, Preserve, or Raspberry Vinegar 463
CHAPTER XVIII.
BAKED PUDDINGS.
Introductory Remarks 464
Almond Pudding 465
An excellent Lemon Pudding 466
Another Lemon Pudding 466
Lemon Suet Pudding 467
Bakewell Pudding 467
Ratifia Pudding 468
The Elegant Economist’s Pudding 468
Rich Bread and Butter Pudding 469
A common Bread and Butter Pudding 470
A good baked Bread Pudding 470
Another baked Bread Pudding 471
A good Semoulina Pudding 471
French Semoulina Pudding, (or Gâteau de Semoule) 471
xxvi Sutherland, or Castle Puddings 472
Madeleine Puddings, (to be served cold) 473
A French Pice Pudding, (or Gâteau de Riz) 473
A common Rice Pudding 475
Richer Rice Pudding 475
Rice Pudding Meringué 475
Ground Rice Pudding 476
Common ground Rice Pudding 477
Green Gooseberry Pudding 477
Potato Pudding 478
A richer Potato Pudding 478
An excellent Sponge Cake Pudding 479
The Duchess’s Pudding 479
Baked Apple Pudding, (or Apple Custard) 479
Another baked Apple Pudding 480
A common baked Apple Pudding 480
Essex Pudding, (cheap and good) 481
Dutch Custard, or baked Raspberry Pudding 481
Gabrielle’s Pudding, or sweet Casserole of Rice 481
Vermicelli Pudding 483
Small Cocoa-nut Puddings 483
Good Yorkshire Pudding 484
Common Yorkshire Pudding 485
Normandy Pudding 485
Damson and Rice Pudding 485
Barberry and Rice Pudding 485
Apple and Rice Pudding 486
Common Raisin Pudding 486
A richer Raisin Pudding 486
Poor Author’s Pudding 486
Pudding à la Paysanne, (cheap and good) 487
Indian Pudding 487
Baked Hasty Pudding 488
CHAPTER XIX.
SOUFFLES, OMLETS, ETC.
Observations on Omlets, Fritters, &c. 489
A common Omlet 490
An Omelette Soufflée 491
Soufflés 491
Kentish Fritters 493
Plain common Fritters 493
Pancakes 494
Fritters of Cake and Pudding 494
Mincemeat Fritters (very good) 495
Fritters of Spring Fruit 495
Apple, Peach, Apricot, or Orange Fritters 496
Brioche Fritters 496
Potato Fritters 497
Lemon Fritters 497
Cannelons 497
Cannelons of Brioche Paste 498
Croquettes of Rice 498
Finer Croquettes of Rice 499
Savoury Croquettes of Rice 499
Rissoles 500
Very savoury Rissoles 500
Rissoles of Fish 501
To boil Pipe Macaroni 501
Ribbon Macaroni 502
Dressed Macaroni 502
Macaroni à la Reine 503
Polenta, an Italian dish (good) 504
Forced Eggs for Salad 505
xxvii CHAPTER XX.
SWEET DISHES.
To prepare Calf’s Feet Stock 506
To clarify Calf’s Feet Stock 507
To clarify Isinglass 507
Spinage-green for colouring Sweet Dishes, Confectionary, &c. 508
Prepared Apple or Quince Juice 509
Cocoa-nut flavoured Milk for Sweet Dishes 509
Compotes of Fruit 510
Compote of Spring Fruit (Rhubarb) 510
—— of Green Currants 510
—— of Green Gooseberries 510
—— of Green Apricots 511
—— of Red Currants 511
—— of Kentish or Flemish Cherries 511
—— of Morella Cherries 511
—— of Damsons 511
—— of Magnum Bonum or other large Plums 511
—— of Bullaces 512
—— of Siberian Crabs 512
—— of Peaches 512
Another receipt for stewed Peaches 512
Stewed Barberries, or Compote d’ epine vinette 513
Another Compote of Barberries for Dessert 513
Gâteau de Pommes 514
Gâteau of mixed Fruits 514
Calf’s Feet Jelly 515
Another receipt for Calf’s Feet Jelly 517
Apple Calf’s Feet Jelly 518
Orange Calf’s Feet Jelly 518
Orange Isinglass Jelly 519
Oranges filled with Jelly 520
Lemon Calf’s Feet Jelly 520
Constantia Jelly 521
Strawberry Isinglass Jelly 522
Fancy Jellies 523
Queen Mab’s Pudding (an elegant summer dish) 524
Nesselrode Cream 525
Crême à la Comtesse (or the Countess’s Cream) 526
Swiss Cream, or Trifle (very good) 527
Tipsy Cake, or Brandy Trifle 528
Chantilly Basket filled with Whipped Cream and Strawberries 529
Crême Meringuée 529
Lemon Cream made without Cream 530
Very good Lemon Creams 530
Fruit Creams and Italian Creams 531
Very superior Whipped Syllabubs 532
Good common Blamange, or Blanc Manger (Author’s receipt) 532
Richer Blamange 533
Jaumange, or Jaûne Manger (sometimes called Dutch Flummery) 533
Extremely good Strawberry Blamange 534
Quince Blamange (delicious) 534
Quince Blamange, with Almond Cream 535
Apricot Blamange, or Crême Parisienne 535
Blamange Rubané, or Striped Blamange 536
An Apple Hedgehog, or Suédoise 537
Very good old-fashioned boiled Custards 538
xxviii Imperial Gooseberry Fool 538
Rich boiled Custards 539
The Queen’s Custard 539
Currant Custard 539
Quince, or Apple Custards 540
The Duke’s Custard 540
Chocolate Custards 541
Common baked Custard 541
A finer baked Custard 542
French Custards 542
German Puffs 543
Meringue of Pears, or other Fruit 544
An Apple Charlotte, or Charlotte de Pommes 544
Marmalade for the Charlotte 545
A Charlotte à la Parisienne 545
Pommes au Beurre (or Buttered Apples) 546
Suédoise of Peaches 547
Arocē Docē (or Sweet Rice, à la Portugaise) 548
Buttered Cherries (Cerises au Beurre) 549
Sweet Macaroni 549
Bermuda Witches 550
Nesselrôde Pudding 550
Strengthening Blamange 551
CHAPTER XXI.
PRESERVES.
General Remarks on Preserving 552
To extract the Juice of Fruit for Jellies, &c. 557
To weigh the Juice of Fruit 557
Green Gooseberry Jelly 557
Green Gooseberry Jam 558
To dry Green Gooseberries 558
Green Gooseberries for Tarts 559
Green Gooseberry Solid 559
Red Gooseberry Jam 560
Very fine Gooseberry Jam 560
Jelly of ripe Gooseberries (excellent) 560
Unmixed Gooseberry Jelly 561
Gooseberry Paste 561
To dry ripe Gooseberries with Sugar 562
Dried Gooseberries without Sugar 562
Cherry Jam 562
To dry Cherries with Sugar 563
Dried Cherries (superior receipt) 564
Cherries dried without Sugar 564
Morella Cherries 565
Common Cherry Cheese 565
Cherry Paste (French) 565
Strawberry Jam 566
Strawberry Jelly 566
Another very fine Strawberry Jelly 567
To preserve Strawberries, or Raspberries (for Creams or Ices without boiling) 567
Raspberry Jam 568
Very good Red or White Raspberry Jam 568
Raspberry Jelly for flavouring Creams 568
Another Raspberry Jelly (very good) 569
Green Currant Jam 569
Red Currant Jelly 570
Superlative Red Currant Jelly (Norman receipt) 570
French Currant Jelly 570
Delicious Red Currant Jam 571
Very fine White Currant Jelly 572
White Currant Jam (a beautiful preserve) 573
Currant Paste 573
Nursery Preserve 573
Another good common Preserve 574
xxix A good Mélange, or mixed Preserve 574
Groseillée, another mixed Preserve 574
A fine Preserve of the Green Orange Plum (sometimes called the Stonewood Plum) 575
Green-Gage Jam, or Marmalade 576
Preserve of the Magnum Bonum (or Mogul Plum) 576
To dry or preserve Mogul Plums in Syrup 577
Mussel-Plum Cheese and Jelly 577
To dry Apricots (a quick and easy method) 578
Dried Apricots (French receipt) 578
Peach Jam, or Marmalade 579
To preserve, or to dry Peaches or Nectarines (an easy and excellent receipt) 580
Damson Jam 581
Damson Jelly 581
Damson Solid 581
Excellent Damson Cheese 582
Grape Jelly 582
English Guava 583
Very fine Imperatrice Plum Marmalade 584
To dry Imperatrice Plums (an easy method) 584
To bottle Fruit for winter use 585
Apple Jelly 586
Exceedingly fine Apple Jelly 586
Quince Jelly 588
Quince Marmalade 589
Quince and Apple Marmalade 589
Quince Paste 590
Jelly of Siberian Crabs 590
To preserve Barberries in bunches 591
Barberry Jelly 591
Barberry Jam (a good receipt) 592
Barberry Jam (second receipt) 592
Very common Barberry Jam 592
Superior Barberry Jelly and Marmalade 593
Orange Marmalade 593
Genuine Scotch Marmalade 595
Orange Conserve for Puddings 596
CHAPTER XXII.
PICKLES.
Observations on Pickles 596
To pickle Cherries 597
To pickle Gherkins 598
To pickle Nasturtiums 599
To pickle Gherkins (a French receipt) 599
To pickle Peaches and Peach Mangoes 600
To pickle Mushrooms 600
Mushrooms in Brine for winter use 602
To pickle Eschalots 602
Pickled Onions 603
To pickle Lemons or Limes 603
To pickle Barberries and Siberian Crabs 604
CHAPTER XXIII.
CAKES.
General Remarks on Cakes 605
To blanch Almonds 606
To pound Almonds 606
To reduce Almonds to a Paste (the quickest and easiest way) 607
xxx To prepare Butter for rich Cakes 607
To whisk Eggs for rich light Cakes 608
Orange-Flower Macaroons 608
Almond Macaroons 608
Imperials 609
Very good small rich Cakes 609
Almond Rocher 610
Fine Almond Cake 610
Pound Cake 611
Rice Cake 611
White Cake 612
A good Sponge Cake 612
A smaller Sponge Cake 613
Another Sponge Cake (quickly made) 613
A good Madeira Cake 613
Banbury Cakes 614
Meringues 614
Thick light Gingerbread 615
Good common Gingerbread 615
Richer Gingerbread 616
Cocoa-Nut Gingerbread 617
Another receipt for Cocoa-Nut Gingerbread 617
Cheap Ginger Biscuits 617
Isle of Wight Dough Nuts 618
Cinnamon or Lemon Cakes 619
Queen Cakes 619
A good light Bun 620
Cocoa-Nut Biscuit 620
Threadneedle-street Biscuits 621
A Galette 621
Cornish heavy Cake 622
Fleed, or Flead Cakes 622
CHAPTER XXIV.
CONFECTIONARY.
To clarify Sugar 622
To boil Sugar from Syrup to Candy or Caramel 623
Barley Sugar 624
Ginger Candy 625
Orange-Flower Candy 626
Orange-Flower Candy (another receipt) 626
Palace Bonbons 627
Everton Toffie 627
Everton Toffie (another receipt) 627
CHAPTER XXV.
DESSERT DISHES.
Mélange of Fruit 628
Fruit en Chemise, or Perlê 628
Peach Salad 629
Orange Salad 629
Compote of Oranges (a Hebrew dish) 629
Oranges warmed 630
Black Caps par excellence 630
Normandy Pippins 631
Stewed Pruneaux de Tours, or Tours dried Plums 631
Baked Compote of Apples (our Little Lady’s receipt) 631
To bake Pears 632
Stewed Pears 632
Boiled Chestnuts 633
Roast Chestnuts 633
xxxi CHAPTER XXVI.
SYRUPS, LIQUEURS, &c.
Strawberry Vinegar, of delicious Flavour 633
Strawberry-acid Royal 635
Very fine Raspberry Vinegar 636
Orange-Flower Ratifia 637
Oxford Punch 637
The Oxford receipt for Bishop 638
To mull Wine (an excellent French receipt) 638
A Birth-day Syllabub 639
Cuirasseau, or Curaçoa (an excellent and wholesome liqueur) 639
The Regent’s, or George the Fourth’s Punch (genuine) 640
The Old Bachelor’s Punch 640
Delicious Milk Lemonade 641
Excellent portable Lemonade 641
Mint Julep (an American receipt) 641
Excellent Barley Water (poor Xury’s receipt) 641
Raisin Wine, which resembles foreign 642
Elderberry Wine 643
Ginger Wine 643
Orange Wine 644
CHAPTER XXVII.
COFFEE, CHOCOLATE, &c.
To roast Coffee 645
To make Coffee in various ways 647
Burnt Coffee (vulgarly called Gloria) 649
To make Chocolate 649
CHAPTER XXVIII.
BREAD.
To purify Yeast for Bread or Cakes 650
The Oven 650
To make Bread 651
To make Bread (Bordyke receipt) 653
Brown Bread 654
Potato Bread 654
Geneva Rolls 654
Rusks 655
Crusts to serve with Cheese 656
Cocoa-nut Bread 656
Good Captain’s Biscuits 656
xxxii APPENDIX.
Brandied Cherries (Tappington Everard receipt) 657
Brandied Morella Cherries 657
Peaches in Brandy (Rotterdam receipt) 657
A Gertrude à la Crême 658
To make Orange Baskets for Jelly 658
Chantilly Baskets 658
An excellent Trifle 659
Croustades, or Sweet Patties, (à la Minute) 659
Apricot Marmalade 660
To clean Bottles in large numbers 660
A Lie for washing Pudding-cloths 660
661

INDEX

The Index was printed at the end of the book, after the Appendix.

Almond, cake, 610

cream, for blamange, 435

paste, 425

paste, sandwiches of, 433

paste, tartlets of, 426

pudding, 465

rocher, 610

Almonds to blanch, 606

in cheesecakes, 431

in custard, 539

mixed with apricot jam, 473

to pound, 606

in soups, 26-27

to reduce to paste, the quickest and easiest way, 607

Anchovy butter, 152

sauce, 126

Anchovies, fried in batter, 96

potted, 356

Apple cake, 422

Charlotte, or Charlotte de Pommes, 544

marmalade for, 545

custards, 540

dumplings, fashionable, 461

fritters, 496

hedgehog, or Suédoise, 537

jelly, 586

jelly, exceedingly fine, 586

pudding, 445

pudding, small common, 446

sauce, 143

sauce, brown, 143

soup, 24

snowballs, 462

Apples, baked compote of, (our little lady’s receipt), 631

buttered, or Pommes au beurre, 546

Apricots, compote of green, 511

dried, French receipt for, 573

to dry (a quick and easy method), 578

Apricot blamange, 535

jam, 660

fritters, 496

Artichokes, to boil, 381

en salade, 381

to remove the chokes from, 381

Jerusalem, to boil, 394

to fry, 394

mashed, 395

excellent sauce of, 147

soup of, 21

à la Reine, 394

Asparagus, to boil, 369

to serve cold, 369

points, dressed like peas, 369

Aspic, or clear savoury jelly, 112

Arnott-Stove, 396

Arocē Docē, or sweet rice à la Portuguèse, 548

Arrow-root, to thicken sauces with, 114

to thicken soup with, 4, 26, 36, 37, 38

Bacon, to boil, 298

broiled or fried, 299

Cobbett’s receipt for, 299

dressed rashers of, 299

French, for larding, 294

lardoons of, 200

to pickle cheeks of, 294

genuine Yorkshire receipt for curing, 292

662

Bain-marie, use of, 113

Baked apple-pudding, or custard, 479

apple-pudding, another receipt for, 480

apple-pudding, a common, 480

minced beef, 235

round of spiced beef, 224

beet-root, 396

bread-puddings, 470-471

calf’s feet, and head, 196

custard, 541-542

haddocks, 79

ham, 197-198

hasty pudding, 488

joints, with potatoes, 198

mackerel, 76

marrow bones, 236

mullet, 81

pike, 85-86

potatoes, 362

salmon, 197

smelts, 82

soles (or soles au plat), 72

soup, 197

sucking-pig, 288

whitings, à la Française, 74

Baking, directions for, 196

Banbury cakes, 614

Barberries in bunches, to pickle, 604

to preserve, 591

stewed, for dessert, 513

Barberry jam, a good receipt for, 592

jam, another receipt for, 592

jam, very common, 592

jelly, 591

superior jelly and marmalade, 593

and rice pudding, 485

tart, 424

Barley-sugar, 624

water, poor Xury’s receipt, 641

Batter, French, for frying meat and vegetables, &c., 154

cod’s sounds fried in, 69

salsify, fried in, 398

spring fruit, fried in, 495

to mix for puddings, 438

Béchamel, 116, 117

Beans, French, to boil, 372

à la Française, 373

another excellent receipt for, 373

Windsor, to boil, 372

Beef, à la mode, 215

breslaw of, 234

cake of, (very good), 211

to choose, 204

collared, 222-223

minced collops of, 228

savoury minced collops of, 228

Scotch minced collops of, 229

richer minced collops of, 229

divisions of, 203

Dutch or hung, 221

fillet of, braised, 199

fillet of, roast, 206

hashed, French receipt for, 235

cold, common hash of, 233

cold, excellent hash of, 233

Norman hash of, 234

heart, to roast, 232

kidney, to dress, 232

kidney (a plainer way), 232

marrow-bones, to boil, 236

marrow-bones, baked, 236

palates, 217

palates (Neapolitan mode), 218

Hamburg pickle for, 220

another, 221

roll (or canellon de bœuf), 227

round of, to salt and boil, 220

spiced round of, 223

roast, round of, 206

rump of, to roast, 206

rump of, to stew, 216

common receipt for salting, 223

shin of, to stew, 214

shin of, for stock, 99

sirloin of, to roast, 204

sirloin of, stewed, 215

663

spiced (good and wholesome), 224

steak, roast, 207

steak, stewed, 210

steak, stewed in its own gravy, 210

steaks, best and most tender, 204

steaks, broiled, 267

steaks, broiled, sauces appropriate to, 208

steaks, fried, 210

steaks, à la Française, 209

steaks, à la Française, another receipt for, 209

steak, pie, 414

steak puddings, 439, 441, 442

good English stew of, 213

German stew, 212

Welsh stew of, 212

tongue (Bordyke’s receipt for stewing), 231

tongue, potted, 356

tongues (various modes of curing), 220-221, 229-230

tongues, to dress, 230

tongues, Suffolk receipt for, 230

Beet-root, to boil, 396

to stew, 396

Bengal currie, 346

Bermuda witches, 549

Birthday syllabub, 639

Biscuits, good Captain’s, 656

ginger, cheap, 617

Biscuit, cocoa-nut, 620

Bishop, Oxford receipt for, 638

Black-cap pudding, 443

Black, caps par excellence, 630

Black cock, and grey hen, to roast, 338

Blamange, or blanc manger, apricot, 535

author’s receipt, 532

calf’s feet, to make, 507

quince (delicious), 534

quince, with almond cream, 535

rich, 538

rubané, or striped, 536

strawberry (extremely good), 534

strengthening, 551

Blanc, a, 185

Blanch to, meat, vegetables, &c., 201

Blanquette, of sucking pig, 288

Boiled calf’s head, 239

chestnuts, 633

eels (German receipt), 87

fowls, 317

leeks, 369

rice, to serve with stewed fruit, &c., 463

rice-pudding, 459

turnip-radishes, 369

breast of veal, 247

fillet of veal, 247

knuckle of veal, 252

loin of veal, 247

Boiling, general directions for, 183

Bone to, calf’s head for brawn, 242

calf’s head, the cook’s receipt, 240

calf’s head for mock turtle soup, 28

a fowl or turkey without opening it, 305

a fowl or turkey without opening it, another mode, 306

fowls, for fricassees, curries, and pies, 308

a hare, 331

a leg of mutton, 270

a loin of mutton for pies, 415

a shoulder of veal or mutton, 250

neck of venison for pies, 411

Boning, general directions for, 201

Bon-bons, palace, 627

Bottled fruits, 525

664

gooseberries, 559

tomatas, or tomata-catsup, 162

Bottles, to clean, 660

Boudin, á la Richelieu, 334

Boulettes, 365

Bouilli, 7

Bouillon, 7

Brain-cakes, 177-178

calf’s, added to soup, 32-33, 44

Braise, to burn, 353

Braised, fillet of beef, 198

leg of mutton, 270

Braising, directions for, 198

Brandy, lemon, for flavouring sweet dishes, 166

peaches preserved in, 657

trifle, or tipsy cake, 528

Brandied cherries (Tappington Everard receipt), 657

morella cherries, 657

Brawn, calf’s head (Author’s receipt), 245

Tonbridge, 306

Bread, Bordyke receipt for, 653

brown, 654

cocoa-nut, 656

crumbs, fried, 155

crumbs, to prepare for frying fish, 69, 155

to fry for garnishing, 156

to fry for soups, 5

partridges, served with, 336

potato, 654

puddings, 458

and butter pudding, 469, 476

sauce, 122

sauce with onion, 123

to purify yeast for, 650

Broth, beef, 7

veal or mutton, 55

Broiled, beef-steak, 193, 207

bacon, 299

cutlets, mutton, 277

cutlets, pork, 290

fowl, 317

mackerel, 77

mullet, 81

partridge, 338

salmon, 194

shad, 83

whitings, 193-194

Broiling, general directions for, 193

Browned, flour for thickening soups and sauces, 155

Browning, with salamander, 203

Brown, rich, English gravy, 102

gravy, common, 108

caper-sauce, 139

chestnut sauce, 149

mushroom sauce, 141

onion sauce, 144

rabbit-soup, 39

Brussels sprouts, 397

Bullaces, jelly of, 583

stewed, or compote of, 512

Bun, a good light, 620

Burlington Whimsey, 241

Burnt coffee, or gloria, 649

Buttered apples, 546

cherries, 549

Butter, anchovy, 152

burnt, 119

clarified, for storing and for immediate use, 119

creamed, and otherwise prepared for cakes, 607

lobster, 357

melted, good common, 118

melted, French, 118

melted, rich, 117

melted, rich, without flour, 118

melted, and parsley, 136

melted, white, 119

loin of lamb stewed in, 282

new potatoes stewed in, 361

Butter-milk, for bread, 653

Cabbage, to boil, 388

in currie, 345-347

stewed, 389

red, to stew (Flemish receipt), 397

665

Café noir, 648

Cake, fine almond, 610

apple, 422

beef or mutton, 211

Cornish, heavy, 622

thick, light gingerbread, 615

a good Madeira, 613

pound, 611

rice, 611

sausage-meat, or pain de porc frais, 301

a good sponge, 612

another sponge (good, and quickly made), 613

a smaller sponge, 613

tipsy, 527

veal, 253

veal, good (Bordyke receipt for), 253

white, 612

Cakes, Banbury, 614

cinnamon, or lemon, 619

flead, or fleed, 622

cocoa-nut gingerbread, 617

common gingerbread, 615

richer gingerbread, 615

queen, 619

very good small rich, 609

to prepare butter for rich, 607

to whisk eggs for light rich, 608

Calf’s head, à la Maître d’Hotel, 244

boiled, 239

boned and rolled, 240

brawn, 245

to clear the hair from, 238

cutlets of, 242

hashed, 243

a cheap hash of, 243

soup, 34

the Warder’s way, 240

Calf’s feet jelly, 515, 517, 518

jelly, in barley-water, 641

jelly, in punch, 638

to prepare for stock, 239

stewed, 261

stock, to clarify, 506, 507

Calf’s-foot, in bouillon, 8

in shin of beef stock, 100

Calf’s-liver, fried, 262

roast, 263

sweetbreads, 260

Candy, ginger, 625

orange-flower, 628

orange-flower, another receipt, 626

Canellons, filled with apricot or peach marmalade, 497

of brioche paste, 498

Caper sauce, 139

for fish, 139

Capillaire in punch, 637

Caramel, to boil sugar to, 623

Carrots, au beurre, 393

to boil, 391

in plum pudding, 456

sweet, for second course, 392

the Windsor receipt, 392

Carrot, soup, common, 22

soup, a finer, 22

Casserole of rice, savoury, 411

sweet, 481

Catsup, the cook’s, or compound, 160

mushroom, 158-160

mushroom, double, 160

lemon, 162

pontac, for fish, 162

tomata, 162

walnut, 161

Cauliflowers, to boil, 379

French receipt for, 379

à la Française, 380

with Parmesan cheese, 380

served with fowls, 317

Cayenne, vinegar, 166

Celery, boiled, 398

salad of, to serve with pheasants, 378

sauce, 148

stewed, 399

Chantilly baskets, 529, 658

Charlotte de pommes, or apple Charlotte, 544

à la Parisienne, 545

666

Cheese, with macaroni, 502

with macaroni, à la Reine, 503

to serve with white and maccaroni soup, 13, 26

Cheesecakes, cocoa-nut (Jamaica receipt), 429

common lemon, 431

lemon (the Christ-Church College receipt), 430

lemon, superior, 430

Norfolk, 432

Madame Werner’s Rosenvik, 431

Cherries, morella, brandied, 657

(Tappington Everard receipt), 657

compote of Kentish, 511

compote of morella, 511

dried with sugar, 563

dried without, 564

dried, superior receipt, 564

morella, preserved, 565

Cherry cheese, 565

jam, 562

paste, 565

pudding, 454

Chestnuts, boiled, 633

roasted, 633

stewed, 400

Chestnut-sauce, brown, 149

white, 149

Chestnut soup, 20

Chetney, various ways of making, 157

Chicken, broiled, 317

cutlets, 319

fried, à la Malabar, 320

pie (common), 413

modern pie, 412

pudding, 442

Chickens, boiled, 317

fricasseed, 318

in soup, 35

China chilo, of, mutton, 277

Chocolate, custard, 541

to make, 649

Chops, lamb or mutton, broiled, 277

mutton, stewed in their own gravy (good), 276

pork, 290

Christopher North’s own sauce for many meats, 131

Cocoa-nut, to break, 510

bread, 656

biscuit, 620

in curries, 344, 350

gingerbread, 617

milk, flavoured with, for sweet dishes, 509

puddings, 483

soup, 20

Cod fish, to boil, 65

slices of, fried, 66

stewed, 66

stewed in brown gravy, 67

Cod’s sounds, to boil, 68

to fry in batter, 69

Codlings with currant juice, 514

Coffee, to boil, 648

breakfast, French, 648

burnt, 649

to filter, 647

to refine, 648

strong, clear, to serve after dinner, called café noir, 648

to roast, 647

Cold, calf’s head to re-dress, 244

fowls, ditto, 321

leg of mutton, ditto, 273

maître d’hotel, sauce, 129

meat, excellent sauces to serve with, 134

salmon, to dress, 65

turbot, ditto, 63

Collops minced, 228-229

sauté pan for frying, 195

Compote, of green apricots, 511

of bullaces, 512

of currants, 511

of green currants, 511

of cherries, 511

667

of damsons, 511

of green gooseberries, 510

of magnum bonum, or other large plums, 511

Conjurer a, its uses, 194

Confectionary, 622

Consommée, 100

Cottage Christmas pudding, 454

Crabs Siberian, jelly of, 590

Cray-fish, to boil, 90

Cream, cake filled with, 658

Chantilly basket filled with, 529

crust, 405

jelly filled with, 523

lemon, made without cream, 530

Nesselrode, 525

sauce for fish, 126

in soups, 15, 21, 24, 26, 27, 36, 37

Crême à la Comtesse, or the Countess’s cream, 526

meringuée, 529

Parisienne, 535

Croquettes of rice, 499

filled with preserve, 499

savoury, 499

Croustades, or sweet patties, à la minute, 660

Croute-aux-crevettes, or shrimp toast, 91

Crust, butter, for puddings, 439

cream, 405

flead, 406

French, for hot or cold meat pies, 405

rich short, for tarts, 407

common suet, for pies, 406

very superior ditto, for pies, 407

suet, for puddings, 438

Cucumber (Author’s receipt, to dress), 375

soup, 47

vinegar, 164

Cucumbers, à la crême, 377

à la poulette, 376

dressed, 375

fried, 377

Cuirasseau, or curaçao, 639

Currants, to clean for puddings and cakes, 437

green, stewed, 510

red stewed, 511

red stewed, served with sweet puddings, 447, 448

Currant, custard, 539

dumplings, 462

jam, green, 569

jam, red (delicious), 570

jam, white, 573

jelly, French, 570

jelly, superlative red, 570

jelly, white, very fine, 572

ditto, tartlets, 433

paste, 573

pudding, 445

Curried eggs, 350

gravy, 352

macaroni, 349

oysters, 351

sweetbreads, 351

Currie, Mr. Arnott’s, 345

a Bengal, 345

to boil rice for, 44, 45

a dry, 346

common Indian, 347

powder, Mr. Arnott’s, 344

Curries, Selim’s (Capt. White’s) 349

Custard, baked, 541

the duke’s, 540

the Queen’s, 539

veal, 422

Custards, boiled, 538

boiled, rich, 539

chocolate, 541

French, 541

quince, or apple, 540

Cutlets of calf’s head, 242

of fowls, partridges, or pigeons, 319

lamb, in their own gravy, stewed, 283

lamb, or mutton, with Soubise sauce, 283

668

mutton, broiled, 277

mutton, in their own gravy, stewed, 276

pork, 290

veal, à la Française, 259

veal, à l’Indienne, or Indian fashion, 258

veal, à la mode de Londres, or London fashion, 259

veal, fried, 257

of sweetbreads, 261

Damson, cheese, 582

jam, 581

jelly, 581

solid, 581

pudding, 444

Des Cerneaux, or walnut salad, 379

Dough nuts, Isle of Wight receipt for, 618

Dried apples, to stew, 631

apricots, French receipt, 578

cherries, with sugar, 563-564

cherries, without sugar, 564

gooseberries with, and without sugar, 562

mushrooms, 167

plums (Pruneaux de Tours), to stew, 631

Dry, to, apricots, a quick and easy method, 578

Imperatrice plums, 584

Mogul plums, 576

peaches or nectarines, 580

Ducks, to roast, 323

stuffing for, 9, 175

wild, to roast, 342

Dumplings, apple (fashionable), 461

currant, light, 462

lemon, 462

Norfolk, 463

Suffolk, or hard, 463

tomata, American, 463

Dutch, or hung beef, 221

custard, 481

flummery, 533

Eels, boiled, German receipt, 87

Cornish receipt, 88

to fry, 87

Egg sauce, for calf’s head, 120

sauce, common, 120

sauce, good, 120

Eggs, curried, 350

forced, for salad, 505

to whisk, for cakes, &c., 608

Elderberry wine, 643

Elegant the, Economist’s, pudding, 453, 468

English, brown gravy, 103

game pie, 411

oyster patties, 420

puff paste, 404

Epicurean sauce, 163

Eschalots, to pickle, 602

to serve with venison, 328

Eschalot sauce, mild, 146

vinegar, 165

wine, 165

Espagnole, or Spanish sauce, 105

with wine, 105

Ears and feet, pig’s, soup of, 17-18-19

Fennel sauce, 136

Feuilletage, or fine-puff paste, 402

Fillets of mackerel, 77

in wine, 78

of soles, 71

of whitings, 74

Fillet of mutton, 273

of veal, boiled, 247

of veal, roast, 247

Fish, boiled, to render firm, 61

brine, for boiling, 60

to choose, 56

to clean, 59

to keep hot for table, 61

to sweeten, when tainted, 60

salt, to boil, 67

salt, à la maître d’hotel, 68

salt, in potato-pasty, 410

Flead, or fleed crust, 406

Flavouring, for sweet dishes, 166

lemon brandy for sweet dishes, 166

669

Flounders, to boil, and fry, 81

Flour browned, for thickening soups, &c., 155

of potatoes (fecule de pommes de terre), 168

of rice, 168

Forcemeats, general remarks on, 169

balls for mock turtle, No. 11, 175

Forcemeat, chestnut, No. 15, 178

cook’s, for geese or ducks, No. 10, 175

good common, for veal, turkeys, &c., No. 1, 170

another good common, No. 2, 171

French, an excellent, No. 16, 179

French, called Quenelles, No. 17, 180

for hare, No. 8, 175

mushroom, No. 7, 174

oyster, No. 5, 173

oyster, finer, No. 6, 173

for raised, and other cold pies, No. 18, 181

common suet, No. 14, 172

superior suet, No. 3, 172

Fowls, to bone, 305, 306, 308

to broil, 317

à la Carlsfors, 316

curried, 346

fried, à la Malabar, 320

hashed, 320

minced (French receipt), 321

roast (French receipt), 315

to roast a, 314

Fowls, boiled, 317

cutlets of, 320

fricasseed, 318

cold, en friture, 322

ditto, grillade of, 322

ditto, the housekeeper’s receipt, 322

French batter, for frying fruit, vegetables, &c., 154

melted butter, 118

crust, for hot or cold pies, 405

receipt for boiling a ham, 298

mâitre d’hotel sauce, 127

rice pudding, 473

partridges, 338

semoulina pudding, 471

salad, 378

salad dressing, 134

salmi, or hash of game, 341

thickening, or roux, 111

beans, à la Française, 373

beans, an excellent receipt for, 373

to boil, 373

Fresh herrings, Farleigh receipt for, 80

Fricandeau of veal, 254

Fried anchovies in batter, 96

bread-crumbs, 155

bread-crumbs for garnishing, 155

cannelons, 498

cod-fish, slices of, 66

mackerel, 76

parsneps, 394

potatoes, 363

salsify, 393

Fritters, apple or apricot, 496

brioche, 496

cake, 494

Kentish, 493

lemon, 497

mincemeat (very good), 495

orange, 496

plain, common, 493

plum-pudding, 494

of spring fruit (rhubarb), 495

Fruit, to bottle for winter use, 585

creams, 531

isinglass-jellies stewed, 510, 511, 512, 513

tart, with royal icing, 423

Frying, general directions for, 195

Galantine of chicken, 307

Galette, 621

Game, to choose, 325

directions for keeping, 326

gravy, 336

670

Garlic, in chetney, 157, 377

morsel of, recommended in sauces, 135

mutton served on, 270

vinegar, 165

Gâteau of mixed fruits, 514

de pommes, 514

de semoule, or French semoulina pudding, 471

de riz, or French rice pudding, 473

Genoises à la Reine, or her Majesty’s pastry, 424

German puffs, 543

pudding, 459

pudding sauce (delicious), 151, 459

Gertrude à la Crême, 658

Gherkins, to pickle, 591

to pickle French receipt, 599

Ginger biscuits, 617

bread, 615, 616, 617

candy, 625

preserved ginger in puddings, 451, 525

wine (excellent), 643

Glaze, to, pastry, 402

Glaze, to make, 111

Glazing, directions for, 202

Goose, to roast, 313

to deprive of its strong odour, 314

Gooseberries, to bottle, 559

dried, with sugar, 562

ditto, without sugar, 562

jelly of, 560

Gooseberry jam, 560

very fine ditto, 560

jelly, 561

paste, 561

pudding, 444-446

sauce for mackerel, 137

Grape jelly, 582

Gravies, to heighten the colour and flavour of, 96

introductory remarks on, 96

shin of beef stock for, 96

Gravy, good beef, or veal (English receipt), 109

good beef or veal (English receipt), 102

common brown, 108

rich brown, 103

cheap, for a fowl, 107

another cheap, 108

curried, 352

Espagnole, highly-flavoured, 105

Espagnole, with wine, 105

for a goose, 109

in haste, 107

jus des rognons, or kidney-gravy, 106

orange, for wild fowl, 109

veal, rich, deep-coloured, 101

veal, rich, pale, or consommée, 100

for venison, 103

another ditto, 104

rich, for venison, 104

sweet sauce, or gravy, for venison, 105

soup, or stock, clear, pale, 10

soup, another receipt for, 11

Green apricots, stewed, 511

gage jam, 579

goose, to roast, 314

mint sauce, 138, 281

mint vinegar, 164

orange plums, preserve of, 575

peas, à la Française, 371

peas, to boil, 370

peas, with cream, 372

peas-soup, cheap, 50

peas, excellent, 49

peas, without meat, 49

Ground-rice puddings, 476, 477

in pudding-pies, 429

Grouse, 339

salmi of, 440, 441

in soup, 42

Guava, English, 583

strawberry-jelly, which resembles, 566

Guinea-fowl, to roast, 317

Haddocks, baked, 79

671

to boil, 79

to fry, 80

Ham, to bake a, 298

to boil a, 296

to boil a, (a French receipt), 298

potted, 354

Hams, Bordyke receipt for, 296

to pickle, 294

superior to Westphalia, 296

genuine Yorkshire receipt for, 292

Hamburgh pickle, for hams, beef, and tongues, 220

another, for hams, beef, and tongues, 221

Hare, to choose, 326

forcemeat for, No. 8, 175

gravy for, 101-103

sweet gravy for, 331

to roast, 327

to roast, superior receipt, 328

soup, superlative, 39

soup, a less expensive, 39

stewed, 331

Haricots blancs, 395

Harrico, Norman, 257

Hashed bouilli, 235

calf’s head, 243

fowl, 320

venison, 239

Hash a, of cold beef, or mutton (excellent), 233

common, of cold beef, or mutton, 233

cheap, of calf’s head, 243

Norman, 234

Haunch of mutton, to roast, 267

of venison, to roast, 327

Herrings, red, à la Dauphin, 95

red, common English mode, 95

Iced pudding, Nesselrode, 550

Ice, advantage of, for jellies, fine paste, &c., 402, 422

Icing, for tarts, &c., 402

Imperatrice plums, to dry, 583

very fine marmalade of, 584

Imperial gooseberry fool, 538

Imperials, 609

Indian currie, common, 347

pudding, 487

Ingoldsby Christmas pudding, 454

Irish stew, 279

Isinglass to clarify, 507

jelly, orange, 519

strawberry, and other jellies, 522

Italian creams, 531

jellies, 523

modes of dressing macaroni, 502

pork cheese, 301

Jam, barberry, 592

cherry, 562

currant, green, 569

currant, red, delicious, 571

currant, white, a beautiful preserve, 573

gooseberry, red, 560

gooseberry, red, very fine, 560

green gooseberry, 560

of mixed fruits, 574

of Mogul plums, 576

peach (or nectarine), 579

raspberry, 568

raspberry, very good, red or white, 568

strawberry, 566

Jaumange, or jaune manger, called also Dutch flummery, 533

Jellies, calf’s feet stock for, 506

to clarify calf’s feet stock for, 507

to clarify isinglass for, 507

Jelly, apple, 586

apple, exceedingly fine, 586

apple, calf’s feet, 518

barberry, 591-593

calf’s feet, 515

calf’s feet, another receipt for, 517

672

lemon, calf’s feet, 526

orange, calf’s feet, 518

Constantia, 521

currant, red, 570

currant, red, french, 570

red currant superlative (Norman receipt), 570

currant, white, very fine, 572

damson, 581

green gooseberry, 557

ripe gooseberry, 560

unmixed, gooseberry, 561

Kater’s, receipt for boiling potatoes, 362

Kentish, receipt for cutting up and curing a pig, 293

fritters, 493

suet pudding, 444

Kidneys, mutton, à la Française, 280

Kidney, beef, to dress, 232

veal, fat, for pudding, 442

Lady’s the, sauce for fish, 129

Lamb, cutlets, 283

leg of, with white sauce, 282

roast loin of, 282

loin of, stewed in butter, 282

to roast a quarter of, 281

roast saddle of, 281

sauce for, 138, 281

Lard, to melt, 285

to preserve unmelted, for many months, 286

to, a pheasant, 200

Larding, general directions for, 200

Larding-pins, 200

Lardoons, 200

Lemonade, delicious, milk, 641

excellent, portable, 641

brandy, 166

Lemon cakes, 619

cheesecakes, 430, 431

dumplings, 462

fritters, 497

jelly, calf’s feet, 520

pickle, or catsup, 162

pudding, an excellent, 466

pudding, another receipt for, 467

suet pudding, 467

tartlets, 431

Lemons, boiled in mincemeat, to pickle, 427, 603

Lettuces, in mayonnaise of fowls, 323

in salads, 377, 378

Limes, to pickle, 604

Lie, or ley, for washing pudding cloths, 660

Liver, calf’s fried, 262

to roast, 263

Lobster, to boil, 89

butter, 357

potted, 357

sauce, common, 124

sauce, good, 124

Macaroons, almond, 608

orange-flower, delicious, 608

Macaroni, ribbon, to boil, 502

pipe, to boil, 501

à la Reine, 503

dressed, 502

with gravy, 502

soup, 13

sweet, 549

Mackerel, to bake, 76

to boil, 75

fillets of, stewed, 77

fillets of, stewed in wine, 78

fried (French receipt), 75

Madeira cake, 607

Madeleine pudding, to serve cold, 473

Magnum bonum plums, to dry, or preserve, 577

Maître d’hotel, sauce, cold, 129

sauce, French, 127

sauce, maigre, 128

sauce, sharp (English receipt for), 127

Majesty’s, her, pastry, 427

pudding, 447

673

Mandrang, or mandram, West Indian receipt, 375

another receipt for, 375

Marmalade, apple, for Charlotte, 545

apricot, 576, 660

barberry, 593

Imperatrice plum, 584

orange, 593

orange, genuine Scotch receipt for, 595

peach, 579

quince, 589

quince and apple, 589

Marrow bones, baked, 236

to boil, 236

clarified, to keep, 237

vegetable, to dress in various ways, 381

Mashed, artichokes, Jerusalem, 395

carrots, 392

parsneps (see turnips), 389

potatoes, 363

potatoes, crust of for pasty, 409

turnips (an excellent receipt for), 389

Mayonnaise, a delicious sauce to serve with cold meat, &c., 134

Mayor’s, the Lord, soup, 17

soup (Author’s receipt for), 18

Meat, jellies for, pies, 109, 111

pies, crust for, 405

puddings, 439, 441, 442

rolls, 420

Mélange of fruit for dessert, 628

Melon, to serve with meat, 377

Melted butter, 118, 119

Meringue of pears or other fruit, 544

Milk, cocoa-nut flavoured, for sweet dishes, 509

lemonade, delicious, 641

Mild eschalot sauce, 146

mustard, 154

Mild ragout of garlic, or l’ail à la Bordelaise, 145

Minced, collops, 228, 229

fowl, 321

veal, 263

veal, with oysters, 264

Mincemeat (Author’s receipt), 427

superlative, 427

fritters, 495

pudding, 456

Mince pies, 428

royal, 428

Miniature, round of beef, 225

Mint julep, 641

sauce, 138

Miss Bremer’s pudding, 451

Mock, brawn, 245, 300

turtle soup, 28

turtle soup, good old fashioned, 31

venison, 271

Modern chicken pie, 412

potato pasty, 409

Moor game, to roast and hash, 338, 339, 340

Mull, to, wine, an excellent receipt (French), 638

Mullagatawny soup, 42

vegetable, 46

Mullet, grey, to boil, 81

red, to bake, broil, or roast, 81

Mushroom catsup, 158

catsup, another receipt for, 160

catsup, double, 160

forcemeat, 174

powder, 167

sauce, brown, 141

sauce, another, 141

sauce, white, 141

toast, or croute aux champignons, 386

Mushrooms, au beurre, 384

dried, 167

with partridges, 337

in pigeon pie, 413

674

pickled, in brine for winter use, 602

to pickle, 600

potted (delicious), 386

Mussel-plums, preserves of, 577

Mustard, to make, 154

Tartar, 153

horseradish vinegar for ditto, 165

Mutton, broth, 55

to choose, 266

cutlets broiled, and Soubise sauce, 283

cutlets, stewed in their own gravy, 276

fillet of, 273

haunch of, to roast, 267

kidneys à la Française, 280

leg of, to boil (an excellent receipt), 273

leg of, boned and forced, 270

leg of, braised, 270

leg of, roast, 268

leg of, roast (superior receipt for), 269

loin of, roast, 274

loin of, stewed like venison, 274

pie, common, 415

pie, good, 415

saddle of, to roast, 268

shoulder of, to bake with potatoes, 198

shoulder of, forced, 276

shoulder of, spiced, 275

a good family stew of, 278

stock for soup, 16

Nasturtiums, to pickle, 599

Nesselrode cream, 525

pudding, 550

Norfolk cheesecakes, 432

sauce, 118

Norman harrico, 432

Nouilles, to make, 6

Old Bachelor’s, the, punch, 640

fashioned boiled custard, 538

Oil, for frying fish, 69

in sauces and salads, 133, 134, 135, 377-378

Olive sauce, 148

Omlette aux fines herbes, 489

soufflée, 491

Omlets, observations on, 489

Omlet, common, 490

Onion sauce, brown, 144

sauce, brown, another receipt for, 144

sauce, white, 144

and sage stuffing for ducks and geese, No. 9, 175

rich white sauce of, or Soubise, 144, 145

Onions, to pickle, 603

stewed, 399

Orange-baskets for jelly, 657

cheesecakes, or pudding, 596

conserve, 596

fritters, 496

gravy, 109

marmalade, 593

plums, preserve of, 575

salad, 629

snowballs, 462

wine, 644

Orange-flower, candy, 626

ratifia, 637

Oranges, compote of (a Hebrew dish), 629

filled with jelly in stripes, 520

warmed, 630

Oxford receipt for Bishop, 638

punch, 637

Ox tail, broiled, 219

stewed, 218

soup, 53

Ox tongue, to pickle, 220, 221, 229

potted, 356

Oyster forcemeat, No. 5, 173

patties, 420

sauce, common, 124

sauce, good, 125

sausages, 94

soup, white, or à la Reine, 36

Oysters, curried, 351

675

to fry, 95

scalloped, à la Reine, 94

to scallop, 93

to stew, 92

Pain de porc frais, or sausage-meat cake, 301

Pain de veau, or veal-cake, 253

Pain de veau (Bordyke receipt), 253

Palates, beef, to dress, 217, 218

Panada, No. 19, 178

Pancakes, 494

Parsley and butter, 136

to crisp, 152

fried, 152

Parsley-green, for colouring sauces, 151

Parsneps, to boil, 393

fried, 394

Partridge, French, or red-legged, to dress, 338

gravy, 336

broiled, 338

potted, 356

pudding, 442

soup, 42

Partridges, boiled, 336

with mushrooms, 337

to roast, 335

salmi, or rich hash of, 340

salmi of (French), 341

Paste, almond, 425

brioche, 407

cherry (French), 565

currant, 573

gooseberry, 561

very good light, 404

fine puff, or feuilletage, 402

quince, 590

Pastry, icing for, 402

her Majesty’s, 424

general remarks on, 401

sandwiches, 433

Pasty, potato, 409

potato, mould for, 409

Pâte Brisée, or French crust for hot or cold pies, 405

Patties, oyster, 420

Patties, tartlets, and small vols-au-vents, to make, 421

Peach, fritters, 496

jam, or marmalade, 579

mangoes, 600

Peaches, compote of, 512

to dry, an easy and excellent receipt, 580

to pickle, 600

preserved in brandy (Rotterdam receipt), 657

stewed, a second receipt for, 512

Suédoise of, 547

vol-au-vent of, 419

Pears, baked, 632

meringue of, 544

stewed, 632

stewed, à la Française, 373

Peas, green, to boil, 376

with cream, 372

Peas soup, common, 52

without meat, 52

rich, 51

Perch, to boil, 86

to fry, 87

Pheasant, boudin of, 334

to roast, 334

salmi of, 340, 341

soup, 40, 41

Pickle, for beef, tongues, and hams, 220, 221

Pickle to, barberries, 604

cherries, 597

eschalots, 602

gherkins, 598

gherkins (French receipt), 599

limes, 604

lemons, 603

mushrooms in brine, 602

mushrooms (an excellent receipt), 602

nasturtiums, 599

onions, 603

peaches, and peach-mangoes, 600

pork, 293

676

Siberian crabs, 604

Pickles, where to be procured good, 597

general remarks on, 596

Pie, beef-steak, 414

a common chicken, 413

a modern chicken, 412

a good common English game, 411

mutton, common, 415

a good mutton, 415

pigeon, 413

Pies, good crust for, 405

suet-crust for, 406, 407

meat jelly for, 109-111

mince, 428

mince, royal, 428

pudding, 429

raised, 416

Pigeons to boil, 325

to roast, 324

served with cresses, for second course, 324

Pig, divisions of, 284

to bake a sucking, 288

sucking, en blanquette, 288

to roast a sucking, 286

à la Tartare, 288

Pig’s cheeks, to pickle, 294

feet and ears, in brawn, 300

Pike, to bake, 85

to bake (superior receipt), 86

to boil, 84

Pippins, Normandy, to stew, 631

Piquante, sauce, 130

Pistachio-nuts, to ornament sweet dishes, 527

Plaice, to boil, 80

to fry, 81

Plum-puddings, 453, 454, 455, 456

Plums, compote of, 511

Poêlée, 185

Polenta (an Italian dish, good), 504

Pommes au beurre, 546

Pontac catsup, 162

Poor author’s pudding, 486

Poor man’s sauce, 132

Pork, to choose, 284

cutlets of, to broil, or fry, 290

Italian cheese, of, 301

observations on, 284, 285

to pickle, 221

to roast, 289

to roast a saddle of, 289

sausages of, 301, 302, 303

Portable, lemonade, 641

Potato-balls (English), 364

boulettes (good), 365

fritters, 497

flour, or fecule de Pommes de terre, 168

pasty (modern), 409

puddings, 488

rissoles, French, 365

soup, 24

Potatoes, à la crême, 366

à la maître d’hotel, 365

to boil (genuine Irish receipt), 359

to boil (Lancashire receipt), 360

fried, 363

mashed, and moulded in various ways, 363

to roast, or bake, 362

scooped, 362

Potted anchovies, 356

chicken, partridge, or pheasant, 356

ham, 354

lobster, 357

meats (various), 353

mushrooms, 386

Potted ox-tongue, 336

shrimps, 357

Poultry, to bone, 305, 306, 308

to choose, 304

observations on keeping, 305

to lard, 200

Powder, mushroom, 167

of savoury herbs, 168

Prawns, to boil, 90

to pot (see shrimps), 357

Prepared apple or quince juice, 509

677

calf’s head (the cook’s receipt), 240

Preserve a, fine, of red currants, 571

delicious, of white currants, 573

an excellent, of the green orange, or Stonewood plum, 575

groseillée, a mixed, 574

another good mélange, or mixed, 574

Preserve, nursery, 573

Preserve to, the flavour and colour of fruit, jams, and jellies, 556

Preserves, French portable furnace and stewpan, convenient for making, 553

general rules and directions for, 555

Pruneaux de Tours, or compote of dried plums, 631

Prince Albert’s pudding, 448

Pudding (baked), almond, 465

apple (or custard), 479

another apple, 480

common apple, 480

apple and rice, 486

Bakewell, 467

barberry and rice, 485

damson and rice, 485

the Duchess’s, 479

the elegant economist’s, 468

Essex, cheap and good, 481

Gabrielle’s, or sweet casserole of rice, 481

green gooseberry, 477

ground rice, 476

a common ground rice, 474

hasty, 487

Indian, 488

lemon, 466

an excellent lemon, 466

lemon-suet, 467

Normandy, 485

à la Paysanne, 487

poor author’s, 486

potato, 488

a richer potato, 488

a common raisin, 486

a richer raisin, 486

ratifia, 468

a common rice, 475

a French rice, or Gâteau de riz, 473

rice, meringue, 475

richer rice, 475

a good semoulina, 471

a French semoulina (or Gâteau de semoule), 471

sponge cake, 479

vermicelli, 482

good Yorkshire, 484

Pudding (boiled), apple, cherry, currant, or any other fresh fruit, 449

a common apple, 446

the author’s Christmas, 456

common batter, 442

another batter, 443

batter and fruit, 444

a Barford plum pudding, 455

beef-steak, or John Bull’s, 439

small beef-steak, 441

a black cap, 443

Ruth Pinch’s, or beef-steak pudding, à la Dickens, 441

superlative beef-steak, 442

bread, 458

brown bread, 459

Bremer’s, Miss, 451

cabinet, 449

a very fine cabinet, 450

cottage Christmas, 454

common custard, 448

small custard, 447

the elegant economist’s, 453

German pudding and sauce, 449

Ingoldsby Christmas puddings, 454

her Majesty’s, 447

678

an excellent small mincemeat, 456

partridge, 442

small light plum, 455

another small, light plum, 445

vegetable plum, 456

pudding, à la Scoones, 453

a very good raisin, 452

a superior raisin, 452

a cheap rice, 460

a good rice, 459

rice and gooseberry, 466

rolled, 458

a cheap suet, 445

another suet, 445

Kentish suet, 444

tomata, 460

a well, 457

Puddings, general directions for, baked, 464

to mix batter for, 438

general directions for boiled, 435

butter crust for, 439

cloths for, to wash, 660

suet crust, for, 438

to clean currants for, 437

small cocoa-nut, 483

Madeleine, to serve cold, 473

Sutherland, or castle, 472

Pudding-pies, 429

a common receipt for, 429

Puff-paste, cannelons of, 497

Puffs, German, 543

raspberry, or other fruit, 634

Punch, old bachelor’s, 640

Oxford, 637

Regent’s, or George IV.’s, (a genuine receipt,) 640

sauce for sweet puddings, 150

Purée of artichokes, 147

fine, of onions, or Soubise sauce, 144-145

of turnips, 147

of vegetable marrow, 146

Quenelles or French forcemeat, 180

Queen cakes, 619

Queen Mab’s pudding, 524

Quince blamange, 534

blamange, with almond cream, 535

custards, 540

jelly, 580

marmalade, 589

paste, 590

Rabbits, to boil, 333

Rabbit, to fry, 333

to roast, 332

soup, brown, 38

soup, à la Reine, 37

Radishes, turnip, to boil, 368

Raisin puddings, 462-486

wine, which resembles foreign, 642

Raspberries, to preserve for creams or ices, without boiling, 567

Raspberry Jam, 568

jam, red or white, 568

jelly, for flavouring creams, 568

jelly, another good, 569

vinegar, very fine, 636

Ratifia, orange flower, 637

pudding, 468

Red cabbage, to stew, 397

Regent’s, or George IV.’s punch, (genuine), 640

Rhubarb, or spring fruit, compote of, 510

Rice, to boil for curries, or mullagatawny soup, 44-45

boiled, to serve with stewed fruit, &c., 463

cake, 611

casserole of, savoury, 411

casserole of, sweet, 481

croquettes of, 499

savoury croquettes of, 499

puddings, 459, 460, 473, 475, 476, 477

soup, 14

soup, white, 15

679

sweet, à la Portugaise, 548

flour, to make, 168

Rice flour soup, 15

flour, to thicken soups with, 4

Rissoles, 500

of fish, 501

very savoury, 500

Roasting, general directions, for, 186

slow method of, 188

Roast beef, (see Chapter VIII.)

chestnuts, 633

game, (see Chapter XIII.)

lamb, (see Chapter X.)

mutton, (see Chapter X.)

potatoes, 362

pork, (see Chapter XI.)

poultry, (see Chapter XII.)

veal, (see Chapter IX.)

Rolled, calf’s head, 240

shoulder of mutton, 275, 276

shoulder of veal, 250

ribs of beef, 225

sirloin of beef, 215

Roll beef, or canellon de bœuf, 227

Rolls, Geneva, 654

Roux, or French thickening brown, 114

white, 114

Rusks, 655

Sago soup, 14

Salad, to dress, 377

French, 378

orange, 629

peach, 629

Suffolk, 378

walnut, or des cerneaux, 379

Yorkshire ploughman’s, 379

dressings, and sauces, 133, 134, 135

Salamander, to brown with, 203

Salmon, to bake, 197

to boil, 63

to broil, 193

crimped, 64

à la St. Marcel, 65

to roast, 197

Salsify, to boil, 398

to fry in batter, 398

Salt fish, to boil, 67

à la maître d’hotel, 67

to, beef, a common receipt, 223

to, limes and lemons for pickling, 603, 604

Sauce, anchovy, 126

baked apple, 143

brown apple, 143

artichoke, 147

asparagus, for lamb cutlets, 138

béchamel, 116

common béchamel, 117

bread, 122

bread, with onion, 123

caper, 139

brown caper, 139

caper for fish, 139

celery, 148

brown chestnut, 149

white chestnut, 149

Chetney, 157

Christopher North’s own (for many meats), 131

cream, for fish, 126

common cucumber, 139

another common cucumber, 140

white cucumber, 141

Dutch, 121

common egg, 120

egg, for calf’s head, 120

very good egg, 120

epicurean, 163

mild eschalot, 146

fennel, 136

fricassee, 122

gooseberry, for mackerel, 137

horseradish, excellent, to serve hot or cold, with roast beef, 130

hot horseradish, 131

the lady’s, for fish, 129

common lobster, 124

good lobster, 124

680

mayonnaise (very fine), to serve with cold meat, fish, or vegetables, 134

maître d’hotel, or steward’s sauce, 127

cold maître d’hotel, 129

maître d’hotel sauce maiqre, 128

sharp maître d’hotel, 129

brown mushroom, 141

another mushroom, 141

white mushroom, 141

Norfolk, 118

olive, 148

brown onion, 144

another brown onion, 144

white onion, 144

common oyster, 125

good oyster, 125

piquante, 130

poor man’s, 132

common pudding, 151

delicious, German pudding, 151

punch, for sweet puddings, 150

sweet pudding sauce, 150

remoulade, 135

Robert, 130

shrimp, 126

Soubise, 145

common tomata, 141

a finer tomata, 142

tournée, or thickened pale gravy, 115

excellent turnip, 147

very common white, 124

English white, 121

Saunders, 236

Sausage-meat, cake of, 301

in chicken pie, 412

to make, 302-303-304

boned turkey filled with, 310

Sausages, boiled, 303

and chestnuts (an excellent dish), 303

Scotch marmalade, 595

Sea kale to boil, 366

stewed in gravy, 366

Sea-Pheasant, or pintail, to roast, 342

Sefton a, or veal custard, 442

Shad, Touraine fashion, 83

Shrimp sauce, 126

toasts, 91

Shrimps to boil, 90

potted, 357

Sippets à la Reine, 6

fried, 5

Sirloin of beef, to roast, 204

stewed, 215

Smelts, to bake, 82

to fry, 82

Snipes, to roast, 341

Soles, baked, or au plat, 72

to boil, 70

to choose, 58

fillets of, 71

to fry, 69

stewed in cream, 72

Sorrel sauce, 137

Soufflé-pan, 489

Soufflés, 491

Sounds cod’s, to boil, 68

to fry in batter, 69

Soup, apple, 24

artichoke, or Palestine, 21

good calf’s head, not expensive, 34

common carrot, 22

a finer carrot, 22

chestnut, 20

cocoa-nut, 20

cucumber, 47

gravy, clear, pale, 10

another gravy, 11

superlative hare, 38

a less expensive hare, 38

in haste, 54

the Lord Mayor’s, 17

the Lord Mayor’s (Author’s receipt for), 18

macaroni, 13

mock turtle, 28

good old fashioned mock turtle, 31

milk, with vermicelli, 56

681

mullagatawny, 42

mutton stock for soups, 16

vegetable mullagatawny, 46

oxtail, 53

white oyster, or oyster-soup à la Reine, 37

parsnep, 25

another parsnep, 25

partridge, 42

common peas, 52

peas, without meat, 52

rich peas, 51

a cheap green peas, 50

an excellent green peas, 48

green peas, without meat, 49

pheasant, 40

another pheasant, 41

potage aux nouilles, or taillerine soup, 13

potage à la Reine, 35

potato, 24

rabbit à la Reine, 37

brown rabbit soup, 39

rice, 14

rice-flour, 15

white rice, 15

sago, 14

semoulina, (or soup à la Semoule), 12

a cheap and good stew, 54

tapioca, 14

common turnip, 21

a quickly made turnip, 24

vermicelli (or potage au vermicelle), 12

Soups, introductory remarks on, 1

to fry bread to serve with, 5

nouilles to serve in, 6

to thicken, 4

vegetable vermicelli, for, 6

Spanish sauce, or Espagnole, 105

sauce with wine, 105

Spiced beef, 223, 224

Spinage, à l’Anglaise, or English fashion, 367

common English modes, 368

French receipt for, 366

green, for colouring sweet dishes, &c., 366

Steaks, beef, 207, 209, 210

Stewed, beef-steak, 210

beefsteak, in its own gravy, 210

beet-root, 396

cabbage, 389

calf’s feet, 261

celery, 399

chestnuts, 400

cucumber, 375

hare, 331

leg of lamb with white sauce, 282

loin of lamb, in butter, 282

mackerel, in wine, 78

fillets of mackerel, in wine (excellent), 78

mutton cutlets, in their own gravy, 276

loin of mutton, 274

onions, 399

oxtails, 218

tomatas, 383

ox, or beef tongue (Bordyke receipt), 231

loin of veal, 248

shoulder of veal, 250

shoulder of venison, 328

Stew, a good English, 213

a good family, 278

a German, 212

an Irish, 279

Spring stew of veal, 255

a Welsh, 212

to, shin of beef, 214

a rump of beef, 216

Stock mutton, for soups, 16

shin of beef, for gravies, 99

veal, for white soups, 16

Store sauces, remarks on, 156

flavouring, for puddings, cakes, and sweet dishes, 166

Strawberries, to preserve, for flavouring creams, &c., 567

Strawberry acid royal, 635

jam, 566

682

jelly, 566

isinglass jelly, 522

tartlets, 433

vinegar, of delicious flavour, 633

Stufato (a Neapolitan receipt), 226

Stuffing for geese and ducks, No. 9, 175

Cook’s stuffing for geese and ducks, 175

Sugar, to boil, from syrup to caramel, 623

to clarify, 622

barley, 624

Sweetbreads, to dress, 260

cutlets of, 261

Syllabub, a birthday, 639

Tamarinds, acid, in curries, 434

Tapioca soup, 14

Tart, barberry, 424

Tartlets, of almond paste, 426

to make, 421

Tarts, to ice, 402, 423

Tench, to fry, 87

Tipsy cake, 528

Tomata catsup, 162

sauces, 141, 142

Tomatas, forced, 383

roast, 382

en salade, 382

stewed, 383

Tongue, to boil, 230

to stew, 231

Tourte meringuée, or tart with royal icing, 423

Trifle brandy, or tipsy cake, 528

an excellent, 659

Swiss, very good, 527

Trout, to stew (a good common receipt), 84

Truffles, à l’Italienne, 388

with champagne, à la serviette, 387

Turbot, to boil, 61

au béchamel, 63

à la crême, 63

Turnip soups, 23, 24

Turnips to boil, 389

to mash, 389

stewed in butter, 390

in white sauce, 390

Vanilla in cream, pudding, &c., 447, 525

Veal, breast of, boiled, 249

breast of, roast, 249

cakes, 253

to choose, 237

cutlets, 257

cutlets, à la Française, 259

cutlets, à l’Indienne, or Indian fashion, 258

cutlets, à la mode de Londres or London fashion, 259

boiled fillet of, 247

roast fillet of, 247

fricandeau of, 254

boiled knuckle of, 252

knuckle of, en ragout, 252

boiled loin of, 248

roast loin of, 247

stewed loin of, 248

minced, 263

minced with oysters, 264

to bone a shoulder of, 250

stewed shoulder of, 250

spring stew of, 255

Sydney, 265

Vegetable marrow, to boil, fry, mash, &c., 381

vermicelli, for soups, 6

Vegetables, brine for boiling, 359

to clear from insects, 359

to keep fresh, 358

Velouté, 116

Venison, to choose, 325

to hash, 329

to keep, 326

to roast a haunch of, 327

sauces for, 103, 104, 105

to stew a shoulder of, 328

Vermicelli, pudding, 482

soup, or potage au vermicelle, 12

683

Vinegar, cayenne, 166

celery, 164

cucumber, 164

eschalot, or garlic, 165

horse-radish, 165

green mint, 164

raspberry (very fine), 636

strawberry, 633

tarragon, 163

Vol-au-vent, a, 418

of fruit, 419

Vols-au-vents, small, to make, 421

paste for, 402

Walnut catsup, 161

White bait, to dress, (Greenwich receipt), 83

Whitings, baked, à la Française, 74

to boil, 74

to fry, 73

fillets of, 74

Wild ducks, to roast, 342

Wine, elderberry, 643

eschalot, 165

ginger, 643

to mull, an excellent receipt, 638

orange, 644

raisin, which resembles foreign, 642

Woodcocks, to roast, 341

Yeast, to purify, for bread or cakes, 650

Yorkshire ploughman’s salad, 379

pudding, 484

Zest, the doctor’s, 169

684

London:
Printed by Stewart and Murray,
Old Bailey.

Notes and Corrections: Preface

within very recent years, [England’s] cookery has remained far inferior to that of nations much less advanced in civilization
[Throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance, England had its own culinary language, documented in any number of books on cookery and housekeeping. Then, in the course of the 18th century, the country simply forgot how to cook and had to learn all over again from the French. I don’t think anyone has ever pinpointed how or why this happened.]

Notes and Corrections: Table of Contents

White Rice Soup 15
text has 5

Brown Rabbit Soup 38
text has 39

Superlative Hare Soup 39
text has 38

To choose Fish 56
text has 57

Salmon à la St. Marcel 65
text has a la

Fillet of Mutton 273
initial “F” invisible

Potted Mushrooms, (see Chapter XV.) 358
text has 356

Mushroom-Toast, or Croute aux Champignons 386
page number missing

Truffles 387
page number missing

Truffles with Champagne (à la Serviette) 387
page number missing

Genoises à la Reine, (or Her Majesty’s Pastry) 424
close parenthesis missing

Another Pudding (light and wholesome) 455
) invisible

Potato Pudding 478
text has 488

An Apple Hedgehog, or Suédoise 537
text unchanged: expected Suèdoise

A Charlotte à la Parisienne 545
text has a

Suédoise of Peaches 547
text unchanged: expected Suèdoise

Arocē Docē (or Sweet Rice, à la Portugaise) 548
text has a la

Bermuda Witches 550
text has “ib.”, i.e. 549

Green Gooseberries for Tarts 559
text has Gooseberies

Meringues 614
text has Maringues

Fruit en Chemise, or Perlê 628
spelling unchanged

Delicious Milk Lemonade ... Excellent portable Lemonade ... Mint Julep (an American receipt)
items printed as shown; in the body text, Mint Julep comes first on the page

Rusks 655
page number missing

Crusts to serve with Cheese 656
page number missing

Cocoa-nut Bread 656
page number missing

Good Captain’s Biscuits 656
item missing from printed Table of Contents

A Gertrude à la Crême 658
text has a la

Apricot Marmalade 660
text has 560

Croustades, or Sweet Patties, (à la Minute) 659
text has a la

Notes and Corrections: Index

Punctuation in the Index was printed as shown, except where two page numbers had a hyphen in place of a comma, as “529-658” for “529, 658”. This generally happened when the Index reference was not to a recipe listed in the Table of Contents, but to a supplementary mention in a footnote or “Obs.” notation. In the Index only, missing commas have been silently supplied.

Apple ... hedgehog, or Suédoise
accent unchanged

Arocē Docē, or sweet rice à la Portuguèse, 548
spelling unchanged; body text has the expected “Portugaise”

Baking ... directions for, 196
text has 136

Beef ... tongue, potted 356
page number missing

Beef ... tongues, Suffolk receipt for, 230
page number missing

Beet-root ... to boil, 396
text has 696

Beet-root ... to stew, 396
text has 696

Boiled ... chestnuts, 633
text has 663

Boudin, á la Richelieu, 334
accent unchanged

Brain ... calf’s, added to soup, 32-33, 44
text has 32-33-44

Bread ... crumbs, to prepare for frying fish, 69, 155
text has 69-155

... and butter pudding, 469-470
text has 469-476

Broiled ... partridge, 338
text has 238

Brown ... chestnut sauce, 149
text has 194

Calf’s sweetbreads, 260
text has 560

Chantilly baskets, 529, 658
text has 529-658

Chicken ... modern pie, 412
text has 12

Cocoa-nut ... in curries, 344, 350
text has 344-350

Crust ... cream, 405
text has 505

Damson ... jelly, 581
text has 58

Dry ... Mogul plums, 576
text has 376

Elegant the, Economist’s, pudding, 453, 468
text has 453-468

Feuilletage, or fine-puff paste, 402
text unchanged: error for fine puff-paste

Fish ... to choose, 56
text has 57 both here and in Table of Contents

Forcemeat ... French, called Quenelles, No. 17, 180
text has No. 171, 80

Forcemeat ... common suet, No. 14, 172
text has 127

Forcemeat ... superior suet, No. 3, 172
text has 127

Fowls ... curried 346
page number missing

Fowls ... ditto, the housekeeper’s receipt, 322
text has re-/receipt at line break

Fruit ... creams, 531
text has creams,531 without space

Garlic, in chetney, 157, 377
text has 157-377
[The “377” is an error—neither garlic nor chetney is mentioned on the page—but I couldn’t figure out what she meant.]

Gertrude à la Crême, 568
text has Crème and 658

Gooseberry ... jelly, 561
text has 361

Gravies, shin of beef stock for, 96
[This and the following entry were reversed at column break, leading to the sequence “Gravies, Gravy, Gravies, Gravy”.]

Gravy, good beef, or veal (English receipt), 102
text has 109

Green ... mint sauce, 138, 281
text has 138-281

Haricots blancs, 395
text has Harricots

Iced pudding, Nesselrode, 550
text has Nesselrôde

Jaumange, or jaune manger, called also Dutch flummery, 533
page number missing

Liver, calf’s fried, 262
page number missing

Liver ... to roast, 263
page number missing

Nesselrode cream, 525
text has Nesselrôde

Orange ... marmalade, 593
text has 393

Oyster ... forcemeat, No. 5, 173
text has 137

Panada, No. 19, 118
[The recipe for Panada comes immediately after forcemeat No. 18, and is called No. 19 in the Table of Contents, but it is not numbered in the main text.]

Pears ... stewed, à la Française, 373
[Printed as shown. Page 373 has Beans à la Française; I couldn’t find any pears.]

Pickle to ... gherkins (French receipt), 599
text has gherkins(French without space

Pig ... à la Tartare, 288
text has 228

Prepared ... calf’s head (the cook’s receipt), 240
page number missing

Preserve ... another good mélange, or mixed, 574
text has melange

Pudding (baked) ... a French rice, or Gâteau de riz, 473
page number missing

Pudding (boiled) ... an excellent small mincemeat, 456
text has 564

Purée ... fine, of onions, or Soubise sauce, 144-145
text has Soubîse

Raspberry ... jelly, another good, 569
text has 369

Raspberry ... jelly, for flavouring creams, 568
text has 368

Rice ... casserole of, savoury, 411
page number missing

Sauce ... punch, for sweet puddings, 150
text has punch,for without space

Shrimps ... potted, 357
text has 359

Stewed ... calf’s feet, 261
text has 362

Sugar, to boil, from syrup to caramel, 623
text has caromel

Syllabub ... a birthday, 639
text has 339

Tourte meringuée, or tart with royal icing, 423
text has meringue

Vanilla in cream, pudding, &c., 445, 525
text has 447-525

Vermicelli ... soup, or potage au vermicelle, 12
text has 112

The original of this text has been in the public domain for years
in the U.S. and most other parts of the world.
All I’ve done is put it online.