Black Beauty

ii

young man in top hat leading horse up to older man in dressing gown holding a lamp

“The Squire stood there with a lamp in his hand.”—p. 85.

Jarrold

iii

Popular Edition / Black Beauty: the Autobiography of a Horse / by A. Sewell. / Nineteenth Edition / London: Jarrold & Sons, 3, Paternoster Buildings.

iv

Recommended by the “Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.”

v

TO

MY DEAR AND HONOURED

MOTHER,

WHOSE LIFE, NO LESS THAN HER PEN,

HAS BEEN DEVOTED TO THE

WELFARE OF OTHERS,

THIS LITTLE BOOK

IS AFFECTIONATELY

DEDICATED.

vi

“He was a perfect horseman, and never lost his temper with his horse, talking to and reasoning with it if it shyed or bolted, as if it had been a rational being, knowing that from the fine organisation of the animal, a horse, like a child, will get confused by panic fear, which is only increased by punishment.”—From the Life of Charles Kingsley, vol. ii., p. 9.

vii

CONTENTS.

half-grown horse standing with his mother
PART I.
CHAPTER PAGE.
I. My Early Home 9
II. The Hunt 12
III. My Breaking in 16
IV. Birtwick Park 21
V. A Fair Start 14
VI. Liberty 30
VII. Ginger 32
VIII. Ginger’s Story continued 38
IX. Merrylegs 43
X. A Talk in the Orchard 47
XI. Plain Speaking 54
XII. A Stormy Day 58
XIII. The Devil’s Trade Mark 63
XIV. James Howard 67
XV. The Old Ostler 71
XVI. The Fire 75
XVII. John Manly’s Talk 80
XVIII. Going for the Doctor 85
XIX. Only Ignorance 90
XX. Joe Green 93
XXI. The Parting 97
horse standing over fallen man lying face down
PART II.
XXII. Earlshall 101
XXIII. A Strike for Liberty 106
XXIV. The Lady Anne, or a Runaway Horse 110
XXV. Reuben Smith 118
viii XXVI. How it Ended 123
XXVII. Ruined, and Going Downhill 127
XXVIII. A Job Horse, and his Drivers 131
XXIX. Cockneys 136
XXX. A Thief 144
XXXI. A Humbug 148
scene of death and destruction after a battle
PART III.
XXXII. The Horse Fair 152
XXXIII. A London Cab Horse 157
XXXIV. An Old War Horse 162
XXXV. Jerry Barker 169
XXXVI. The Sunday Cab 177
XXXVII. The Golden Rule 183
XXXVIII. Dolly and a Real Gentleman 188
XXXIX. Seedy Sam 193
XL. Poor Ginger 198
XLI. The Butcher 201
XLII. The Election 205
XLIII. A Friend in Need 208
XLIV. Old Captain, and his Successor 214
XLV. Jerry’s New Year 220
people gathered around fallen horse in the street
PART IV.
XLVI. Jakes and the Lady 228
XLVII. Hard Times 233
XLVIII. Farmer Thoroughgood and his Grandson Willie 239
XLIX. My Last Home 244

grazing horse silhouetted against the sunset

Notes and Corrections: Introduction

[The four drawings illustrating the Contents are from the Thomas Crowell edition (ill. Bridgman), where they appeared in the body text at the beginning of each Part. The final small drawing of a horse at sunset is from the Hovendon edition (ill. Toaspern), where it appeared at the very end of the book.]

From the Life of Charles Kingsley
Italicized as shown.
[The original, multi-volume edition of Charles Kingsley: His Letters and Memories of his Life was published in 1877, just in time to be quoted in the first edition of Black Beauty. The two-volume abridged edition, which is much easier to find, came later; it doesn’t include this passage.]

The original of this text is in the public domain—at least in the U.S.
My notes are copyright, as are all under-the-hood elements.
If in doubt, ask.