old house overlooking a broad lawn

The Family Mansion.
Drawn by Allan Barraud.
(See page 204.)

The Sketch-Book of
Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.
by Washington Irving

English travellers are the best and the worst in the world. Where no motives of pride or interest intervene, none can equal them for profound and philosophical views of society, or faithful and graphical descriptions of external objects, but when either the interest or reputation of their own country comes in collision with that of another, they go to the opposite extreme, and forget their usual probity and candor in the indulgence of splenetic remark and an illiberal spirit of ridicule.

Today The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon is best known for giving us “Rip van Winkle” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”. Modern-day critics love to point out that Irving didn’t make these up from scratch; both are based on older German stories. To this, the only possibly reply is, “Yes, and . . . ? Ever hear of Shakespeare?” In any case, the book doesn’t begin and end with short fiction. We’ve got essays on various historical subjects, descrip­tions of English people and places, even a whole segment about Christmas celebrations.

Although Washington Irving (1783–1859) is known as one of the earliest major American writers, he spent much of his adult life in Europe. He first visited Liverpool in 1815, and stayed on in England for several years. In 1826 he was sent to the American legation in Spain, where he lived off and on for the next 20 years, only returning to America near the end of his life.

Volume One

Christmas

Volume Two

Title Page (this page)

About the Book

The Sketchbook was originally published in the U.S. in seven installments—not in a periodical, but as free-standing issues—from June 1819 to September 1820. The two-volume book format was introduced by the first British publisher, also in 1820. But unlike so many transatlantic publications from this era, it wasn’t a work of unauthorized piracy. As told in the introductory material, Irving seems to have made some good connections in the publishing world.

The arrangement of the book generally corresponds to the serial version—at least for the first five installments (through the Christmas stories). The four essays that made up the seventh American installment are scattered around the second half of the book. The pair of essays “Traits Of Indian Character” and “Philip Of Pokanoket” weren’t included in the serial version, though they had both appeared in an American periodical a few years earlier.

Over the next few editions, the exact volume division shifted bit by bit as more material was added. In 1820, “Westminster Abbey” was the first essay in Volume II; in 1821 it moved to the end of Volume I. By the time we get to the present (1894) edition, the first of five closely connected Christmas stories had also been pushed back, leaving it stranded by itself in Volume I.

Illustrations

This ebook is based on the generously illustrated Van Tassel edition from 1894. Most illustrations were made for this edition, but one set is almost half a century older. Artists in alphabetical order:

Allan Barraud Allan Barraud signature
One illus­tration in Volume I, three more in Volume II. (In the ebook, that means two in the Chistmas segment, along with the Volume II frontis­piece shown at the top of this page.)
He was probably English, since an Allan F. Barraud—“landscape painter and etcher”—exhibited regularly at the Royal Academy from 1873 to 1900, while the name Barraud doesn’t appear at all in Fielding’s directory of American artists.
His middle name may have been Frederick; he may have been born in 1847, and he may have died in 1912 or 1913. (Sources are sketchy, especially when it comes to the “Says who?”) I don’t know if he was related to the Barraud family of artists. That would include: photographer Herbert Rose Barraud (1845–1896); his brother Francis J. Barraud (1856–1924), who gave us the “His master’s voice” dog; their father, landscape painter Henry Barraud (1811–1874); and Henry’s brother, animal painter William Barraud (1810–1850).
F. S. Church
Just one illustration, towards the end of Volume I.
Frederick Stuart Church (1842–1924) was an American illustrator especially known for animals. But not exclusively, as shown by his sole illustration in these volumes.
F. O. C. Darley
Unlike the other illustrations, Darley’s—six each for “Rip van Winkle” in Volume I, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” in Volume II—were recycled from an earlier publication. If he signed the drawings, it is too cleverly concealed for me.
Felix Octavius Carr Darley (1822–1888) was well known as an illustrator of Big Name American writers. His year of birth is generally given as 1822, though his gravestone clearly says 1821. Go figure. His drawings for “Rip van Winkle” and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” were made during Irving’s lifetime: in 1848 and 1849, respectively.
Arthur Rackham Arthur Rackham signature
Two illus­trations in Volume I, two more in Volume II (one of them in the Christ­mas segment).
That’s “the” Arthur Rackham (1867–1939), here seen near the beginning of his career. In fact this year, 1894, was also the year of Rackham’s first notable work as illustrator, the English edition of The Dolly Dialogues. He must have had some affinity for Washington Irving; in 1905 he would illus­trate an edition of “Rip van Winkle” featuring sixty color paintings.
Julian Rix Julian Rix signature
One illus­tration in each volume.
Julian Walbridge Rix (1850–1903) was best known as a landscape painter. He was unequivocally American: born in Vermont, raised in California, worked alternately in San Francisco and on the east coast.

That covers the drawings and paintings. Quite a few pictures are identified only as “from a photograph”, without naming the photographer. The ones accompanying “Rip van Winkle” are more exactly identified as “from a photo­graph of Joseph Jefferson”. That’s comic actor Joseph Jefferson (1829–1905), who became closely identified with the Rip van Winkle role. After an early success in Our American Cousin (“Aside from that, Mrs. Lincoln . . .”) he took on Rip, first in 1859 and later in a new version by Irish playwright Dion Boucicault. He played the role on both sides of the Atlantic for the rest of his life.

And finally: In the printed book, each page was surrounded by a decorative border—four designs, in rotation. Since this wouldn’t work well in an ebook, but it was a shame to leave them out, I’ve used the border designs as a title page for each chapter instead.

Formalities

This ebook is based on the two-volume Van Tassel edition (New York and London, Putnam/Knickerbocker, 1894–95). Rather than leave the Christmas stories straddling two volumes, I have pulled them into a separate segment. Footnotes—some of them exceedingly long—are collected at the end of each chapter.

Typographical errors are marked with mouse-hover popups and are listed again at the end of each chapter. The word “invisible” means that the letter or punctuation mark is missing, but there is an appropriately sized blank space.

Van Tassel Edition

The Sketch-Book
of
Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.

“I HAVE NO WIFE NOR CHILDREN, GOOD OR BAD, TO PROVIDE FOR. A MERE SPECTATOR OF OTHER MEN’S FORTUNES AND ADVENTURES, AND HOW THEY PLAY THEIR PARTS; WHICH, METHINKS, ARE DIVERSELY PRESENTED UNTO ME, AS FROM A COMMON THEATRE OR SCENE.”

BURTON.

By
Washington Irving

Volume I
Volume II

G. P. PUTNAM’S SONS

NEW YORK
27 West Twenty-third Street

LONDON
24 Bedford Street, Strand

The Knickerbocker Press
1895

Copyright, 1894
by
G. P. PUTNAM’S SONS

 

Electrotyped, Printed and Bound by
The Knickerbocker Press, New York
G. P. Putnam’s Sons

Contents of Both Volumes

Volume I
Preface to the Revised Edition ix
The Author’s Account of Himself 1
The Voyage 6
Roscoe 17
The Wife 29
Rip Van Winkle 42
English Writers on America 75
Rural Life in England 91
The Broken Heart 103
The Art of Book-Making 113
A Royal Poet 125
The Country Church 149
The Widow and her Son 159
A Sunday in London 172
The Boar’s Head Tavern, Eastcheap 176
The Mutability of Literature 196
Rural Funerals 215
The Inn Kitchen 235
The Spectre Bridegroom 239
Westminster Abbey 266
Christmas 285
Volume II
The Stage Coach 1
Christmas Eve 13
Christmas Day 32
The Christmas Dinner 55
London Antiques 80
Little Britain 90
Stratford-On-Avon 116
Traits of Indian Character 149
Philip of Pokanoket 168
John Bull 197
The Pride of the Village 216
The Angler 232
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow 248
L’Envoi 304
Appendix 308

Full-Page Illustrations

Volume I
THE WEALTHY CITIZEN’S DAUGHTERS ARRIVE AT THE CHURCH

Drawn by Arthur Rackham

Frontispiece
“IT PROVED TO BE THE MAST OF A SHIP”

Drawn by Julian Rix

10
“HE WAS A GREAT FAVORITE AMONG ALL THE CHILDREN OF THE VILLAGE”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

44
“HE WOULD CARRY A FOWLING-PIECE FOR HOURS”

From a photograph of Joseph Jefferson

46
“HIS SON RIP, AN URCHIN BEGOTTEN IN HIS OWN LIKENESS”

From a photograph of Joseph Jefferson

50
“A TART TEMPER NEVER MELLOWS WITH AGE”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

54
“A CLUB OF SAGES, PHILOSOPHERS, AND OTHER IDLE PERSONAGES OF THE VILLAGE”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

58
“HIS COMPANION MADE SIGNS TO HIM TO WAIT UPON THE COMPANY—HE OBEYED WITH FEAR AND TREMBLING”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

60
“HERE POOR RIP WAS BROUGHT TO A STAND”

From a photograph of Joseph Jefferson

64
“‘MY VERY DOG,’ SIGHED POOR RIP, ‘HAS FORGOTTEN ME’”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

66
“DOES NOBODY KNOW RIP VAN WINKLE?”

From a photograph of Joseph Jefferson

68
“RIP’S STORY WAS SOON TOLD”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

72
“THE MERCHANT IN HIS SUBURBAN FLOWER-GARDEN”

Drawn by Arthur Rackham

92
“RURAL REPOSE AND SHELTERED QUIET”

From a photograph

96
“WHEN THE BELL IS SENDING ITS SOBER MELODY ACROSS THE QUIET FIELDS”

Drawn by Allan Barraud

100
WINDSOR CASTLE FROM THE THAMES

From a photograph

126
“SHE STEPPED LIGHTLY TO THE WINDOW”

Drawn by F. S. Church

260
THE CHOIR, WESTMINSTER ABBEY, LOOKING EAST

From a photograph

272
Volume II
THE FAMILY MANSION

Drawn by Allan Barraud

Frontispiece
THE STAGE COACH

Drawn by Allan Barraud

6
“THE CHAISE STOPPED AT THE GATE”

Drawn by Allan Barraud

16
“ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL LITTLE FAIRY GROUPS”

Drawn by Arthur Rackham

34
“AFTER DINNER THE YOUNG FOLKS WOULD PLAY HIDE AND SEEK”

Drawn by Arthur Rackham

106
THE AMERICAN WINDOW—STRATFORD-ON-AVON PARISH CHURCH

From a photograph

126
HOLY TRINITY PARISH CHURCH, STRATFORD-ON-AVON

From a photograph

146
“TO HAUNT THE SIDES OF PASTORAL STREAMS, WITH ANGLE RODS IN HAND”

Drawn by Julian Rix

232
“ICHABOD CRANE’S SCHOLARS CERTAINLY WERE NOT SPOILED”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

254
“HE WAS BOARDED AND LODGED AT THE HOUSES OF THE FARMERS WHOSE CHILDREN HE INSTRUCTED”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

260
“IN THE MEANTIME ICHABOD WOULD CARRY ON HIS SUIT UNDER THE GREAT ELM”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

272
“ICHABOD PRIDED HIMSELF AS MUCH UPON HIS DANCING AS UPON HIS VOCAL POWERS”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

284
“THE HAIR OF THE AFFRIGHTED PEDAGOGUE ROSE UPON HIS HEAD WITH TERROR”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

294
“AWAY THEY DASHED, STONES FLYING, AND SPARKS FLASHING AT EVERY BOUND”

From a drawing by F. O. C. Darley

298